Determining A Brand’s Message

Published April 24, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

unnamed

Today we continue our examination of the role a company’s image plays and how to determine a brand’s message in the development of their marketing campaigns. To market a product or a company effectively, management teams must have a concept of how to promote and position themselves to stand apart from the competition. In his book, Brand Against the Machine, Morgan (2012) postulates that the number one asset any organization or individual has is their unique personality and their attitude. This is what makes them stand apart from the others. A successful image of a company, therefore, can increase the value of that business dramatically. When it comes to creating a corporate image or creating an organizational attitude, perception is one of the most significant components to consider. For instance, one way a company can create an attitude is by conveying that their brand is not merely a campaign that makes promises, but that their actions and behavior convey a commitment to keep those promises (Morgan, 2012). Business leaders that comprehend this concept are ahead of the game when it comes to creating value. In short, their attitude can also bring them added value.

staffing3

In her webinar, Marketing What Matters, the second strategic practice Dr. Meggin McIntosh (2015) revealed in her webinar is the importance of determining a brand’s message. One method marketing managers use to make this determination is by engaging in strategies that can help them enter the conversations that are already taking place in the minds of their best consumers. This means that leaders must identify what they are offering and communicate that message simply and clearly. If consumers are confused, they will not be motivated to try out that brand.

Unemployed Americans attend a National C

Marketing managers must also do their best to determine what the brand benefits are, versus what their features are. For example, a business that offers a specific product like an electronic tablet, would need to find out, (a) which consumers would want to use their product, (b) why a consumer would be interested in spending time using their brand, and (c) how the consumer’s life will change or be different after their experience with that brand’s product.

apple-logo1

Finally, in determining a brand’s message Dr. McIntosh purports that the firm must be consistent in how they present their image and products. In other words, they must not only be consistent in delivering the same message through their logo, and the methods they deliver their transmissions, they must also display an appropriate level of professionalism, convey that they care about what they are promoting and selling, and that they are in alignment with their mission statement by keeping their promises.

Well, that’s a wrap for this time. Next week we will focus on the last three strategic practices Dr. McIntosh uses to help leaders develop tactical and straightforward methods to communicate messages about who their brand is, what they do and why they matter. Until then … stay organized!

********

“If you put yourself in a situation of unpredictability and then find that it’s completely possible to accept it, then you become an observer.” – David Tudor

********

business skills development April 2015 - 2

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author’s Page

References:

Dr. Meggin McIntosh, P. (2015). Marketing what maters. Marketing What Matters (p. 21). Reno: Meggin McIntosh, PhD.

Morgan, J. (2012). Brand against the machine: How to build your brand, cut through the marketing noise, and stand out from the competition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Discovering What Motivates Consumers

Published April 22, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

motivation_meme_gandhi_motivation1

On Monday we looked at how marketing strategists define their market. Today we dive a little deeper to discover what motivates consumers. Leaders that distinguish the difference between attitude and values are more likely to develop a brand that will experience long lasting success as well as build solid relationships and a loyal customer following. In their book, Integrated Advertising, Promotion and Marketing Communications, Baack and Clow (2012) explain that attitudes also reflect individual values and that these perceived values and attitudes are key roles that influence consumer decisions. For example, typically, educated consumers incorporate two strategies in the decision making process that can influence their feeling or attitude: (a) the gathering of information and (b) the evaluation of alternate choices (Baack & Clow, 2012). This means, that motivation plays a key role in swaying their attitude in the decision making process. This element determines the amount of enthusiasm they engage to support their needs and wants.

download (1)

Additionally, lower costs and higher benefits are factors that can influence consumer emotions and attitudes. These are a few components that help shape consumer feelings toward making decisions and remaining loyal. This means it is in the company’s best interest to develop strategies that provide consumers with substantial information about their products and services as well as a reason why they offer the best choices over any alternatives. These are factors that can help communicate a positive company image to consumers. This in turn affects their attitude and ultimately makes the company more valuable to them.

TUNDRA-MOTIVATED

In her webinar, Marketing What Matters, the second strategic practice Dr. Meggin McIntosh (2015) suggests is for leaders to discern what motivates their target audience. In other words, once a firm establishes who their best customers are and who their most valuable prospects are, the next step is figuring out what they want. One way to achieve this is to answer questions like: Do they want to make a difference? Do they want to create or do something that matters? Do they want to produce something that wastes less time?

questionnaire1

To answer questions like these marketing managers can engage in conversations or by face-to-face discussions with consumers. This is one of the best ways to find out what motivates the people they are trying to reach. Other strategies may include focus groups, surveys, networking through social media outlets, interviewing past clients to find out what they thought, or for the ones that left, why they did so. Also effective are reading books, articles online or in magazines to pick up what is trending as well as developing research and development teams to help with the production of effective campaigns. These are all samples of effective strategies that are used to help marketing managers discover what motivates their audience so they can devise campaigns that will help people care more about their brands and what the firm is promoting.

That’s it for this today. On Friday we will examine Dr. McIntosh’s third strategic marketing practice that was developed to help managers determine a brand’s message. Until then … stay organized!

********

“To keep the body in good health is a duty, otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.” – Buddha

********

Breaching Ad available now

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author’s Page

References:

Dr. Meggin McIntosh, P. (2015). Marketing what maters. Marketing What Matters (p. 21). Reno: Meggin McIntosh, PhD.

Morgan, J. (2012). Brand against the machine: How to build your brand, cut through the marketing noise, and stand out from the competition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Defining Your Market

Published April 20, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

17

Last week we examined the role Image plays in the development of a firm’s marketing strategies. This week, we will take a closer look at how business leaders communicate their brand image. Companies that are looking to develop efficient strategies to achieve their goals find unique ways to so. In other words, an effective marketing campaign will communicate the company’s message using images that focus on the strong points of an organization’s brand. This is one of the best ways they can connect emotionally with the consumer. In their book, Integrated Advertising, Promotion and Marketing Communications, Baack and Clow (2012) assert that the marketing aspect of an organization should include the production of consistent images that are developed to help build trust and loyalty with their customers (Baack & Clow, 2012). For example, a company’s image can identify what the company represents and well as how recognizable it is in the marketplace.

geico-caveman-airport

The GEICO Company continues to display their advertising genius with clever ads. My personal favorite was the national campaign ad that made consumers believe getting car insurance was so easy even a caveman could do it. Ads like these display their brilliant strategic moves which have been responsible for maintaining GEICO’s dominance in the auto insurance industry. Their innovative ads incorporate humor and typically introduce new characters which bring attention to their company in a unique way. Their strategies are effective because their campaigns do not take away from the image or brand they have carefully crafted which is based on trust and good service. Their ads focus on simple themes that emphasize how their service can benefit consumers. Their groundbreaking ads also effectively help broaden their target audience. In short, building a strong corporate image provides many benefits that help establish a company’s foundation to help them build a solid reputation.

defining-a-target-market-290x300

In her webinar, Marketing What Matters, Dr. Meggin McIntosh (2015) recommends six strategic practices to consider in the development of marketing campaigns. Today we will take a look at the first strategy: Define Your Market. One of the first significant concepts Dr. McIntosh disclosed in her marketing seminar was to remind us that the purpose of marketing is to promote something a firm or individual is so passionate about they want to share it with others. The best way to begin is to define the audience they want to communicate that message to. In other words, if a company doesn’t identify who their audience is, they will have a difficult time finding them. One way to do this is by narrowing the parameters using tactics like the red velvet rope policy which restricts certain people, like those that would not be included in their campaigns. This means that strategists must know who they are selling to, so they can develop how they promote their brand.

bc2b4af14ba7c87fc6d2ab0bd83ef966

Equally important, is in knowing who the competition is. Most people think of competitors as another firm or business that may offer the same products or services. However, Dr. Meggin points out that competition can also include how a consumer spends their time and where they focus their attention. These are equally significant aspects that can affect a target audience. Therefore, marketing strategists must also consider different ways to entice audience members to try their brand by conveying why consumers should spend their time using their brand rather than going elsewhere for their needs.

Secret Weapon

Marketing expert John Romero suggests using the following simple formula when plotting out marketing campaigns:

  1. Develop primary marketing strategies focused to appeal to the best customers first;
  2. Develop secondary strategies focused to target the best prospects second;
  3. Focus on the rest of the world last

download

That’s wraps up today’s discussion. On Wednesday we will look more closely at Dr. McIntosh’s second strategic practice designed to help marketing teams figure out what motivates consumers. Until then … stay organized!

********

“The first step to success is getting out of your own way.” – Steven Stromick

********

Lippincott Room at Princeton University Press

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author’s Page

References:

Baack, D., & Clow, K. (2012). Integrated advertising, promotion, and marketing communications (Fifth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NY: Pearson Education, Inc.

Dr. Meggin McIntosh, P. (2015). Marketing what maters. Marketing What Matters (p. 21). Reno: Meggin McIntosh, PhD.

 

Why Brand and Image Benefit Marketing Strategies

Published April 17, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

SW-record-keeping

Today we conclude our examination of the role a company’s image plays in the development of their marketing strategies. Many company leaders run into obstacles operating their business and think they can solve them by coming up a new logo and cleaning up their website to help change their image. The truth is, creating a trustworthy, relatable company image requires a great deal of strategizing and planning rather than merely engaging in a simple form of stagecraft like updating the logo and website.

dreamworks oil

In his book, Brand Real, Laurence Vincent (2012) suggests that developing a successful company image also means keeping promises that deliver simple, yet powerful experiences. He postulates that a company’s image should represent these significant elements, whether it is a small business, a large corporation, or personal brand, like Beyoncé, Dr. Oz, or Senator Elizabeth Warren (Vincent, 2012). To create a successful company brand, smart leaders develop strategies that integrate marketing campaigns to support the promises companies make offering explanations on how they intend to keep those promises. These integrated components serve to build trust and a positive experience for consumers.

Dr-Oz-interview-on-KiSS-92.5

When developing a company’s image, leaders must define their market. In her webinar, Marketing What Matters, Dr. Meggin McIntosh (2015) states that in order to win consumer trust, companies must know what people want, how they feel and find ways to get them excited to entice them to take action. Therefore, in order to achieve successful outcomes, a company must communicate that information from the image they present and include that concept in their marketing efforts, so that audience members feel confident in moving forward to experience that brand.

That’s it for this week. Next week we will begin to take a closer look at six strategic practices Dr. McIntosh suggests to help leaders develop tactical and straightforward methods to get the word out about who a company is, what they do, and why it matters. Until then … stay organized!

 ********

“Self-trust is the first secret to success.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

********

Marie review Breaching

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

References:

Dr. Meggin McIntosh, P. (2015). Marketing what maters. Marketing What Matters (p. 21). Reno: Meggin McIntosh, PhD.

Vincent, L. (2012). Brand real: How smart companies live their brand promise and inspire fierce customer loyalty. New York, NY: AMACOM.

How Brand and Image Play a Role in Strategic Marketing

Published April 15, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

shareholder

On Monday we assessed the significance of developing an image that helps build consumer trust. Today we will dive a little deeper to help understand why. In his book, Brand against the Machine, John Morgan (2012) points out that the partnership a firm has with their shareholders is also critical to the success of their image, or brand. He further explains, that because of technological breakthroughs, new marketing strategies will be designed with people and not at them (Morgan, 2012). In short, in order to stand out in today’s crowded marketplace, companies are looking to include innovative tactics to present their image and will do so in a unique way to engage their audience. Plus, companies are developing strategies to win consumer business by giving more and selling less.

apple-logo1

To reach successful outcomes, a company’s goal is to position themselves (and their brand) in the mind of the consumer as one of, if not the top authority in their industry. To achieve this, they must know how to promote themselves and present an image that is different from that of their competition as well as deliver what they promise.

handshake

In her webinar, Marketing What Matters, Dr. Meggin McIntosh (2015) points out that every business is interested in providing more information about their services and goods. Their desire is to create an awareness about the firm that affect their emotions in a positive way, so consumers will consider doing business with them. They key to creating a marketing campaign is to know what the company’s goals are and deliberately and mindfully come up with a plan to achieve them (Dr. Meggin McIntosh, 2015). The company image, therefore, should provide an emotional connection to the audience. In other words, a company’s image is not only about market share, it is about mind-share. To develop an effective company image or brand, leaders must be able to communicate to potential clients the following components: (a) who they are; (b) what they do; and (c) who they do if for.

That’s it for this time. On Friday we conclude our discussion on the significance of a company’s image and how it plays a key role in a firm’s marketing strategies. Until then … stay organized!

********

“The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” – Bertrand Russell 

********

business skills development April 2015

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

References:

Dr. Meggin McIntosh, P. (2015). Marketing what maters. Marketing What Matters (p. 21). Reno: Meggin McIntosh, PhD.

Morgan, J. (2012). Brand against the machine: How to build your brand, cut through the marketing noise, and stand out from the competition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

How A Firm’s Brand and Image Helps Consumers

Published April 13, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

images

This week we return after having taken time away for relaxation, reflection, study, and rejuvenation. We begin the week by taking a closer look at the concept of “image,” how a brand name or corporate image can affect a company’s outcomes, and also examine the role it plays in a firm’s marketing strategies.

social media logos oil

Let’s face it, in today’s world, leaders face a global marketplace that is overcrowded, noisy, and extremely competitive. In spite of this chaos however, corporate executives are still able to develop a unique image or brand. Furthermore, because of the internet and advances in technology, they can now build unique relationships directly with their target audience. In fact, now that studies have revealed over 50% of emails are read on a mobile device, corporations are directing their marketing strategies to include electronic devices to expand their customer reach.

google (1)

This is why consumers are continuously bombarded with thousands of messages that push a company’s image, whether that person is interested or not. In this new market place, employers conduct business by interrupting their target audience repeatedly with their messages. Consumers typically face these brands any time they log on to social media outlets. This is why a company’s image is important.

IF

Last week I attended a powerful accelerated learning webinar hosted by Dr. Meggin McIntosh called Marketing What Matters (2015). One of the first things she disclosed was the importance of a company’s ability to communicate what they want consumers to know about them, how to feel about their products and/or services, and communicate why they are the best choice to help them with their needs. Smart leaders also know, that when a customer is excited and has a positive feeling about a service or product, they are motivated to take action (Dr. Meggin McIntosh, 2015). This is why the most successful corporate managers include these components in the decision making process when developing a company’s image. Their intent should be to give consumers an opportunity to get to know them better, help them feel safe about their services or products, so audiences can in turn, offer their support and ongoing loyalty.

That’s it for this week. On Wednesday we continue our examination of the importance of a company’s image and the role it plays in the company’s marketing strategies. Until then … stay organized!

********

“Success is the progressive realization of predetermined, worthwhile, personal goals.” – Paul J. Meyer

********

mission coming soon ad

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

References

Dr. Meggin McIntosh, P. (2015). Marketing what maters. Marketing What Matters (p. 21). Reno: Meggin McIntosh, PhD.

 

Greek Orthodox Good Friday

Published April 10, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

friday_05

According to the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, Good Friday is described as the day the faithful commemorate the death of Jesus on the Cross. For Orthodox Christians this is the culmination of the observance of His Passion by which Jesus suffered and died for the sins of the believers. This commemoration actually begins on Thursday evening with a service called the Matins of Holy Friday and concludes with a Vespers service on Friday afternoon where the unnailing of Jesus from the Cross and the placement of His body in the tomb are observed. This service is meant to commemorate the sufferings of Jesus: the mockery, the crown of thorns, the scourging, the nails, the thirst, the vinegar and gall, the cry of desolation, and all that Jesus endured on the Cross.

saturday_18

Orthodox Christians return later that evening to attend Friday night services, listening to readings that relate the last instructions of Jesus to His disciples, the prophecy of the drama of the Cross, the dramatic prayer of Jesus and His new commandment.

friday_01

Then, after the reading of the fifth Gospel comes the procession with the Crucifix around the church, while the priest chants and the congregation respond with prayers and song. During this Procession, Orthodox Christians kneel, pay their respects to the Cross, and pray for their spiritual well-being. The service concludes with the faithful approaching to reverently kiss the Crucifix which has been placed at the front of the church.

christian-easter-2014-kldco5db

Well, that wraps up our posts this week of how Greek Orthodox Christians celebrate Holy Week leading up to Easter. Thank you for allowing us to share some of these magnificent traditions that have been passed down from generation to generation which million of Greek Orthodox families continue to honor and observe worldwide .

Mayr will be back next week with all new posts … until then … enjoy the beauty that life has to offer and stay organized!

opo0432d

A New View of the Helix Nebula

********

When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be. – Lao Tzu

********

business skills development April 2015 - 2

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

References:

Great and Holy Friday. (2015). Retrieved April 5, 2015, from Great lent, holy week and pasca: http://lent.goarch.org/holy_friday/learn/

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 723 other followers