Giving Thanks

Published November 21, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

Friday Thx

Our continued thanks to everyone who has been participating in our first Giving of Thanks Audiobook Collection Giveaway! We are very grateful for your celebrating this season of appreciation with us.

It’s not to late to participate. Simply send an email with GIVEAWAY in the subject line. Then submit your name in the body of the email and send it to us at:

mediamagick@yahoo.com.

At the end of November, we will award ten lucky winners the entire collection of our accelerated learning business life audio book series! Good luck everyone!

zen master TNH

(Note: This is a re-edited version of an article Mayr posted earlier this year).

In his many writings, Zen Master Hanh, teaches that when an individual is feeling confident and well-balanced, that person is capable of reacting and responding to unexpected events in a more understanding fashion, and can even perhaps find humor from the experience. For example, emotions can go from calm to ballistic when reflecting on the story I shared about a mom whose toddler transformed their bathroom into the kind of chaotic condition that one would expect to see had Bugs Bunny’s Tasmanian devil paid them a brief visit.

Using that incident as an example, I was able to determine that from a calm state of mind, a parent is better equipped to show compassion in that kind of situation, knowing that the child was merely engaged in an act of exploration to learn more about their environment. In other words, this is typical behavior for children that age. Knowing this, the parent can respond lovingly and take accountability for the risk they took in choosing to leave a small child alone. However, like many parents with young children, they are typically overtasked and shorthanded on help. A scene like that is enough to heighten anyone’s emotional being (especially if they are sleep deprived). From a state of heightened emotions, the parent may feel so overwhelmed already that this additional incident can lead the individual towards a nervous breakdown–which, in turn, may prompt that caretaker to respond from a place of anger and thereby release negative energy on the small child, who was innocently occupied in age-typical behavior.

 outofcontrol

In my book, Ethics in the Real World (2013), I explained that how we respond or react to unplanned events that heighten our emotions can have a profound effect on our outcomes. In other words, when we choose to react to an unexpected situation emotionally and without thinking, we risk contaminating the situation even further. Therefore, regardless of our emotional states of mind, when faced with any unforeseen event, there are many effective coping skills we can utilize for help.

The first step is to stop, take a moment or a deep breath, and allow for time to calm down before saying anything that can cause more hurt feelings or contaminate the situation even further. Of course, the initial priority in responding is to make sure everyone involved is safe and there is no present danger. Once the situation has been briefly assessed and any possible dangers or threats have been eliminated, the next plan of attack is the inevitable, cleaning up the mess and devising a plan to address the situation that heightened the emotions. By taking a moment to think before acting, the individual can respond more logically to a crisis at hand. Then, once the situation feels more under control, order can be restored, and all parties involved eventually will return to a calmed state.

 Angry Man

When a person feels steamed about a situation or has issues with another individual, they do their best to manage the dilemma and the emotions that accompany it, working hard to find solutions. Sometimes, however, there are those instances when they believe the harder they try, the worse it gets. Meanwhile, their emotions continue to escalate, leaving them in a state of helplessness and unable to come up with solutions. In this frame of mind, they are overwhelmed, even making comments like, “It’s just not my day.” Then there are instances when they become illogical and out of control spewing comments like, “This is the worst day of my life!” In this frame of mind, heightened emotions typically lead to further despair, leaving many tumbling in a downward spiral. In short, the individual feels like they are experiencing nothing more than one failure after another in everything and anything they attempt, no matter how hard they focus to change or improve the situation, nothing seems to work.

inner peace

It is under these conditions that Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh (2013) suggests we retreat to our inner home and engage in practices that will lead to our own emotional tidying up. In other words, this is when we can go to what Hanh refers to as the island of self, to find sanctuary and more clarity for the dilemmas we may face. A simple strategy, for instance, like being mindful of in-and-out breathing, is one effective coping skill that can help us manage heightened emotions. Hanh purports that these strategies help focus the mind in the present moment. They serve as relaxation tools which have been successful for communities like Plum Village for stress management and calming emotions.

By incorporating strategies that nurture us when we are feeling lost, we are building a culture of happier people. Strategists agree that people who are happy are more inclined to perform at optimum levels–which, in the long term, contributes to better outcomes for the entire community. In other words, by practicing coping skills that help enable individuals acknowledge and recognize their strong emotions, people are better equipped to process and work through them without creating more challenges–whether they stem from fear, anger, anxiety, or despair. To sum up, whatever strong emotions we are confronted with, once we acknowledge and recognize them, we can implement coping strategies to help us manage them in the same way loving parents do when a child is upset and in distress: by embracing them tenderly and then, step-by-step, applying a coping skill strategy we feel comfortable with, to manage the emotional upheaval. In other words, respond to ourselves as loving parents when we become emotionally out of balance.

Well … that’s a wrap for this week. Have a great weekend everyone!

3 organizational management business skills publications nov 2014

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing.

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People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar. - Thich Nhat Hanh

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References:

Berry, M. A. (2013). Ethics in the Real World. USA: Kindle Direct Publishing.

Hanh, T. N. (2012). Work: How to find joy and meaning in each hour of the day. Berkeley, CA: Parallax Press.

A Time of Giving

Published November 19, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

Wednesday Thx

A special thanks to everyone who has been participating in our first Giving of Thanks Audiobook Collection Giveaway! We appreciate your celebrating this season of gratitude with us.

Anyone interested in participating, simply send an email with GIVEAWAY in the subject line. Then submit your name in the body of the email and send it to us at:

mediamagick@yahoo.com.

We will award ten lucky winners the entire collection of our accelerated learning business life audio book series at the end of November! Good luck everyone!

Zen Master Hahn

(Note: This is a re-edited version of an article Mayr posted earlier this year).

Upon reflecting on the many teachings I learned from reading Zen Master Hanh’s book, Work: How to Find Joy and Meaning in Each Hour of the Day (2012); one of the most significant discoveries for me was realizing that most people were feeling just like me – burnt out from dealing with pressures from work, expectations from colleagues, commitments to loved ones, financial obligations, relationship issues, and so forth. As tensions continued to build, more and more of us were unable to operate at full capacity. For example, because many individuals are currently operating with low tolerance levels, more often than not, they are inclined to respond quickly with short explosive fuses that tend to result in destructive, and in extreme cases, engage in acts of violent conduct.

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People that react from fear and panic, initially respond from a fight or flight state of mind. That is when the reptilian part of the brain takes over which instinctively goes into survival mode. It is from this heightened state that typically many individuals engage in behavior with little or no regard for ethical outcomes. Their only objective in operating from this attitude is a successful outcome. In other words, irrational responses are more likely to occur when decisions are made quickly from an extreme emotional mental state, rather than allowing a moment to think of a situation appropriate response before taking action.

There are exceptions, of course, when life and death situations occur. A split second decision in an emergency may be crucial. Under these conditions taking a moment to think rationally may not be an option. However, in other instances, when pressure is mounting in an individual’s personal or business life, in addition to their feeling that the world is in complete disarray, the sensation of hopelessness can prompt some individuals to behave irrationally; giving in to unethical or destructive behavior.

give me give you

It seems logical, that especially during those times when we feel that: (a) the world seems unfair, (b) an escalating amount of respected leaders are caught behaving unreasonably, and (c) more people than not, seem to be engaged in misconduct, that is when we really need to get involved and help make positive changes. Not just in our immediate environment, collectively, we also need to become more cognizant of our contributions as a global family. In other words, take accountability when we make mistakes, bad judgement calls, or hurt others. It also requires that we engage in behavior that reflects mindful, responsible citizenship in our business affairs and home environments.

One way to achieve this is to help cultivate an ethical climate by making conscious choices to conduct ourselves reasonably with common sense and compassion for others. For example, when we encounter people or an institution engaged in unethical behavior like cheating, stealing, lying, or illegal conduct, we are faced with one of three choices: (a) expose the behavior, (b) ignore the behavior, or (c) participate and condone the behavior. If we choose to expose the behavior, we risk being chastised as whistle blowers, but by courageously moving forward we can help achieve ethical outcomes. If we ignore the behavior, we avoid the risk of not fitting in as a player at the corrupted culture and save everyone involved the embarrassment of getting caught. However, by keeping silent, we are helping to enable unethical behavior. If, on the other hand, we choose to condone the behavior, even participate in it, we are not only contributing to an unethical culture, we are gambling that we will not get caught or face the consequences for engaging in misconduct.

cheating

This is where ethics comes into play. In my publication, Ethics in the Real World (2013), I explained that individuals who make the best ethical choices do not engage or support strategies that include lying, cheating, stealing, or illegal conduct.  The truth is, most people are not interested in conducting business with others they do not trust. Furthermore, leaders who lack ethics and cultivate a culture of fear are not likely to earn respect from their staff or the community for that matter (Berry, 2013). When individuals, whether in respected positions of power or not, use tactics of intimidation, illegal conduct, misdirection, or get caught in blatant lies, they jeopardize tarnishing their reputation and credibility permanently.

Thich Nhat Hanh (2013), however, compares all our emotions to weather events—they blow in, remain for a time and move on. He suggests that if we stop all our thinking when these storm fronts of strong emotions develop (and I will add “refraining from verbalizing and directing toxicity towards others” to this list), we can help prevent fueling the fire. Instead, we can choose to apply mindful practices like breathing and walking strategies as coping techniques, that will not only calm down our breath when we are feeling out of control, they also serve to help calm the body and mind (Hanh, 2012).

jiAan

The truth is, we all have strengths and weaknesses and will continue to face many temptations throughout our journey in life. Although it may take only one person to help shift a corrupted culture, it still requires others to follow suit. Taking all this information into consideration can help us understand more clearly why it makes sense that during those times when we are feeling most vulnerable, confused, and overwhelmed with emotions, that including a component of ethics in the decision making process can help us achieve outcomes we are content to live with.

That’s it for this post. Until next time …  Be mindful and stay organized!

organizational management business skills publications nov 2014

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing.

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Because of your smile, you make life more beautiful. - Thich Nhat Hanh

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References:

Berry, M. A. (2013). Ethics in the Real World. USA: Kindle Direct Publishing.

Hanh, T. N. (2012). Work: How to find joy and meaning in each hour of the day. Berkeley, CA: Parallax Press.

A Time of Thanks

Published November 17, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

Monday Thx

A heartfelt thank you to everyone participating in Media Magic’s first Giving of Thanks Audiobook Collection Giveaway! We are deeply grateful for your continued support and celebrating this season of appreciation with us.

Anyone can still participate. Simply send an email with GIVEAWAY in the subject line. Then submit your name in the body of the email and send it to us at:

mediamagick@yahoo.com.

Then, at the end of November, we will award ten lucky winners the entire collection of our accelerated learning business life audio book series! Good luck everyone!

Zen Master Hahn

In the meantime, to honor a great teacher that has recently fallen ill, I was inspired to post a few articles this week that I published earlier this year. These posts were influenced by the gentle teachings on mindfulness, from Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, because the truth is, that many of his books have been instrumental in providing me tools on how to stay focused, balanced, and cope with stress in this wacky world we live in today. A world that includes food shortages, unemployment, natural disasters, and the shock and horror of war! Is it any wonder that so many of us are on the edge, stressed, and sleep deprived, struggling to manage anxiety and process emotional states of depression?

It seems that conflict, discontent, and corruption are found within every fold in the fabric of life all around us — in our communities, governments, spiritual and academic institutions, the workplace, and of course at home, away from the public’s awareness. The negative input individuals are constantly bombarded with from such conditions, have contributed to a collective consciousness of defensive people ready to engage in battle at the drop of a hat. Many are working diligently to suppress their feelings of deep rooted rage which continues to build as they process the added pressure exerted on them.

out-of-place

As a result, many feel displaced and confused about their values or what their purpose in life is for that matter. This is one reason a person can lose focus at work leaving them vulnerable to making costly mistakes or engage in altercations with colleagues. Some even become confused over career aspirations while others are trying to discern who is authentic and trustworthy. Individuals that operate from this mindset risk advancing heightened levels of emotions which can eventually escalate into feelings of panic if they are not addressed. From this state of anxiety it is understandable how a person can travel down a corridor of darkness and despair unless they are able to find a way to manage their concerns in a healthy manner.

wpid-stress

In a corporate setting, managers that look away or allow this kind of behavior to go unchecked, not only risk creating more harm in an organizational setting, it may also lead that staff worker into believing they have no one to turn to for help, or worse, there is no one they feel safe enough to seek counsel from. When a sense of hopelessness reaches this level that individual also risks losing faith in their own abilities and intuitive reasoning. This is why many lose motivation to participate at work and eventually begin to feel the same about life in general, risking eventual self-destruction. At this stage the individual risks becoming so imbalanced they are unable to function productively and may even eventually lose their ability to cope or behave in an ethical manner.

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These are some of the outcomes that occur if growth strategies are not implemented.  In a business arena, the best growth strategy is a well-planned one. In fact, there are many studies to support that implementing growth strategies are more likely to yield positive outcomes as well as higher performance levels. Liker (2011) for example, postulates that growth strategies are implemented because they enable improvement considerably and in a shorter period of time. This is achieved by developing a framework that encourages perpetual growth which can help achieve some of the following outcomes: (a) a significant upper hand in operation excellence in a relatively short amount of time; (b) the development of systems that target and eliminate toxic behavior; (c) smoother operations with respect to receiving and delivering messages; and (d) the ability to adapt to changing environments rather than respond from a reactive position (Liker, 2011). In other words, effective growth strategies encourage continuous improvements while eliminating waste.

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In addition, growth strategies can play a role to help individuals establish and reach their desired destination. For example, when an individual plans for a road trip, without the use of a map or a GPS system to guide the traveler to their journey’s end, the navigation process can become more difficult. This is a good way to approach growth strategies – as the road maps that help with expansion to reach desired outcomes. Coulter (2010) suggests that growth strategies can help in the development process because they assist in locating and allocating resources that can transform the individual’s capabilities into distinctive functional competencies that others are unable to easily duplicate (Coulter, 2010). In short, effective growth strategies can help individuals achieve their goals quicker because they consist of focused detailed plans.

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By applying some of the growth strategy principles I discovered in my organizational management research work, which are compiled in my digital publications, I feel better equipped to weather and navigate through various emotional storm systems that emerge because these strategies are based on the scientifically proven principles of positive psychology. This approach has been significant in my own ability to work through moments of darkness as an effective tool to help minimize destructive outcomes, which continued to re-occur when enhanced emotions guided my actions.

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As we all have experienced at one time or another, when emotions are out of balance, it is difficult to perform at optimum levels because we put focus on input that works against our energetic current, rather than feeling gratitude for all that is flowing harmoniously in our world. In other words, by focusing only on what is not working in the world, or in our lives, it feels like we are trying to swim against a strong current rather than sail with it.

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Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh (2012) stated that once we learn how to manage enhanced emotions we can experience more rewarding relationships. In addition, keeping channels of communication open can also help us cultivate more joyful experiences in our lives (Hanh, 2012). Growth strategies offer us a different way to navigate through and manage challenging events more effectively without fueling the situation even further by focusing on negative thoughts or energy patterns.

That’s it for now! Until next time … stay organized!

2 organizational management business skills publications nov 2014

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing.

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Hope is important because it can make the present moment less difficult to bear. If we believe that tomorrow will be better, we can bear a hardship today. – Thich Nhat Hanh

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References:

Coulter, M. (2010). Strategic management in action (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Hanh, T. N. (2012). Work: How to find joy and meaning in each hour of the day. Berkeley, CA: Parallax Press

Liker, J. (2011). Design for Operational Excellence. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Giveaway of Thanks Sweepstakes!

Published November 14, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

giveaway 3

Thanks to everyone that’s been participating in our first Giving of Thanks Audiobook Collection Giveaway! We appreciate your helping us celebrate this season of gratitude and appreciation.

To participate, simply send an email with GIVEAWAY in the subject line. Then submit your name in the body of the email and send it to us at: mediamagick@yahoo.com.

Then, at the end of November, we will award ten lucky winners the entire collection of our accelerated learning business life audio book series! Good luck everyone!

accelerated learning ad TWO - Oct 2014

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing.

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Meditation is all about the pursuit of nothingness. It’s like the ultimate rest. It’s better than the best sleep you’ve ever had. It’s a quieting of the mind. It sharpens everything, especially your appreciation of your surroundings. It keeps life fresh. - Hugh Jackman

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Thanks Giveaway Sweepstakes!

Published November 12, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

thanks giveaway

Media Magic is happy to announce our first Giving of Thanks, Audiobook series Giveaway to celebrate this season of gratitude and appreciation for everyone’s continued support. Plus, they make great holiday gifts for business professionals!

To participate, simply send an email with GIVEAWAY in the subject line. Then submit your name in the body of the email and send it to us at: 

mediamagick@yahoo.com.

It’s that simple! Then, at the end of November, we will award ten lucky winners the entire collection of our accelerated learning business life audio book series! Good luck everyone!

business life ad Oc 2014

If you are interested in more tips on enhancing your leadership skills; are interested in more information on effective strategic planning; or just want to find out how to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing.

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The roots of all goodness lie in the soil of appreciation for goodness. - Dalai Lama

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November Thanks Giveaway!

Published November 10, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

thanks giveaway 1

To celebrate this season of gratitude, Media Magic is happy to announce our first November Thanks Giveaway! As a humble way of showing our appreciation and giving thanks to all of you for your ongoing support, we are giving away to ten lucky people, the entire collection of our audiobook series.

To participate, simply send an email with GIVEAWAY in the subject line. Then submit your name in the body of the email and send it to us at: mediamagick@yahoo.com.

At the end of November, we will randomly choose ten lucky winners and award them with all four copies of our accelerated learning business life audio books! Good luck everyone!

accelerated learning ad Oc 2014

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing.

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As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.- John F. Kennedy

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Understanding and Coping With Change

Published November 7, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

The-Winds-of-Change

(Note: This is a re-edited version of an article Mayr posted on LinkedIn).

We live in exhilarating times. Western civilization is witnessing the greatest changes everywhere since the Industrial Revolution. If we want a deeper understanding of the prospect of change, we are forced to pay heed to our own powerful inclinations to avoid change.

Many of us have a low tolerance for change because we are individuals of habit that follow mindless daily routines. In nature, growth involves periodic accelerations and transformations. Initially, things appear to progress slowly. Nothing seems to occur when suddenly, an egg shell cracks, a blossom blooms, or a butterfly emerges. In fact, when it comes to forces of nature, the most widely addressed and studied topic is what physicists call entropy – the process by which dynamic systems that include (a) people, (b) organizations, (c) automobiles, and (d) solar systems, gradually fall apart.

ChangeHope-300x199

It is hard to make significant changes in any human group without changing an individual’s behavior and the underlying meaning that gives rise to their behavior (Kegan & Lahey, 2001). Once change does occur, it is inevitably disruptive. The fact is Americans in general, have always been in some state of transition with Old World families that can be traced back to the home of their ancestors. In addition, new destinations and career opportunities keep people moving – driven by faith and a belief of better things to come. The sad truth is, that even though it opens the doors to new opportunities, most people are hesitant to embrace change because of the unknown.

However, change is inevitable. It’s part of the growth process. In fact, extensive transformations are taking place in organizational management between employers and employees. The lessons learned about how job security, training, and internal development that improve employee assurance and performance, have given way to a new set of teachings regarding how companies can reduce fixed costs, increase flexibility, and improve functionality by eliminating the intricate employment systems that traditionally prepared employees for extended careers in their organizations. The old procedures protected employees from external market forces. The new arrangements drag the market by downsizing, incorporating provisional workforces, outsourcing jobs, and compensation plans that are contingent upon organizational performance. Morale is down and stress is up, driving employee performance up largely due to fear of the shortage of good jobs (Cappelli, et al., 1997). As a result, individuals experience changes in their jobs in ways they cannot control from both internal and external factors.

friendly relationships

At some time we all experience change in the workplace and are inclined to devise short term solutions as mechanisms to cope. When a person feels a lack of control, or is entering a new domain, it can increase levels of stress and potentially affect a person’s ability to perform competently. According to John Kotter’s management theory, employees who are prone to resistance share common motives that include: (a) self-interest, (b) a lack of understanding to the nature of the change, (c) a lack of trust in management, (d) differing assessments of the need for change, and (e) a low tolerance for change (Baack, 2012). To help reduce the internal factor that manifests as stress, one must learn coping techniques and strategies to help with change in a manner that allows more self-control, as well as the ability to continue performing effectively.

One type of external factor that contributes to an individual’s resistance to change can occur in the form of a job promotion. For example, through hard work and dedication the individual is rewarded a higher position for their effectiveness within the institution. The internal component that emerges is customarily one of excitement and a renewed motivation to perform at higher levels. An element of resistance may surface however, from the additional level of commitment expected that involves lengthier hours and extensive travel. For the most part, the employee embraces change for reasons of self-interest since it increases their level of power, money, prestige, and job security, as well as the personal conveniences that accompany the new appointment.

Hard transmissions

In an organization, a person’s attitude plays a key role to how a transition pans out. The pace of change can make an individual feel disoriented and with an uncertain helpless sensation. People begin to lose faith when routine patterns of daily life are interrupted. Transitions appear meaningless without a sense of accomplishment.

The process of change involves three stages (a) an ending, (b) a period of distress and confusion, and (c) a new beginning for those capable enough to embrace it (Bridges, 2004). The fact is that every transition begins with an ending. That key component in my view is the first step to accepting change. In the meantime, Kotter developed the following eight step plan as a model to help individuals embrace change more effectively:

  1. Establish a sense of urgency and a compelling reason to make the change.
  2. Form a power coalition to lead the change.
  3. Create a new vision with supporting strategies.
  4. Communicate the vision to all involved.
  5. Empower others to act on the vision which includes the encouragement of risk taking and creativity.
  6. Plan for and reward short-term “victories” that move toward the new vision.
  7. Consolidate improvements, reassess the changes and make the necessary adjustments.
  8. Reinforce change by showing the relationship to organization success (Baack, 2012).

In addition, supervisors can respond to an employee’s resistance to change through strategies that include tactics in communication, education, involvement, facilitation, support, participation, cooperation, manipulation and coercion.

nonverbal cues

When people are unable to change in the workplace, it can come with a great price to the organization as a whole. For instance, it can impact health, productivity, well-being, and also affect motivation and individual performance levels. Another strategy leaders encompass is the development of a plan that includes an analysis to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT). The SWOT strategy encourages ideas that minimize areas of weakness and limit threats; keeping focused on maximizing strengths and opportunities (Stockdale & Steeper, 2012). No matter what approach is used, leaders need to understand that change is often unsettling and to expect that employees will be uncomfortable for a while.

The truth is, that most of the power in the world is external. It is generally fabricated from the ego and plays an important role in the external factors of change. It influences the military, police and security; politics, financial institutions, social situations, and both the private and corporate arenas. The internal factors of change on the other hand, are contingent upon the development of one’s inner power and personal freedom. Information, knowledge, and perception are three key components to increasing personal strength and balance. Integrating spirituality and psychology is beneficial in developing inner power and personal freedom. An individual, for instance, that possesses inner power displays personal fortitude, strength of character, discipline, psychological integration and a spiritual serenity (Wilde, 1995). A person that displays an obsessive personality in contrast, however, can become emotionally overwhelmed, making it more difficult to embrace change.

In conclusion, the future is uncertain, whether it’s a manager, a job, an employment status, a working style, or an industry that’s changing. Fostering a solid strategic plan is the key to making changes we encounter, a smooth transition. In these times of economic turbulence, it seems ironic that the only constant is in fact – change.

business life ad Oc 2014

Well, that’s it for this week! Thanks again for stopping by. Have a great weekend everyone … and stay organized!

For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

 Media Magic Publishing.

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Whatever words we utter should be chosen with care for people will hear them and be influenced by them for good or ill. - Buddha

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References

Baack, D. (2012). Organizational behavior. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

Bridges, W. (2004). Transitions: Making sense of life’s changes (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.

Cappelli, P., Bassi, L., Katz, H., Knoke, D., Osterman, P., & Useem, M. (1997). Change at work. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, USA.

Kegan, R., & Lahey, L. L. (2001). How the way we talk can change the way we work. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Stockdale, S., & Steeper, C. (2012). Cope with change at work. Reading, Berkshire UK: Teach Yourself.

Wilde, S. (1995). Whispering winds of change. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, Inc.

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