New Employees and Reinventing the Wheel

Published June 3, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

Business Meeting

Embracing a new employee into an organization’s fold is not an easy process.  Employers seek ways to make a new hire’s orientation process a smooth experience to help transition the employee into the organization as quickly as possible. Sims (2011) postulates that successful training programs with high-end strategies that include activities, checklists, and implement the latest tools and technology can help make the orientation process a positive experience. In addition, designing creative methods of on-boarding is effective in gathering significant data with measurable results (Sims, 2011). Employers should also engage in formal training programs for their employees, otherwise supervisors must verbally and repeatedly advise employees how to perform their jobs. This method is less effective and leaders risk: (a) employees developing a lack respect for the line supervisors, (b) staffers beginning to lack confidence in performing their tasks from the inconsistent methods they are taught, and (c) it garners lower performance and motivational levels in personnel.

jobdescription

It is important that an employee become familiar with their job so that they may perform it as efficiently as possible to help them achieve organizational goals.  It is the responsibility of the employer, however, to provide a detailed description of the skills, knowledge, attitude, attendance expectations and other pertinent information that is expected of the employee regarding the position being filled and the consequences for not operating within those parameters.  Equally important is that employers convey the organizational culture so that employees comprehend the organization’s vision and acceptable conditions with which to operate. Lawson (2002) pointed out that although employees are the most valuable resource of any organization, most companies do not support this premise because of the manner in which they welcome a new hire. Primarily because the orientation process (if any) consists of boring programs, are lecture driven with little opportunity for interaction, and are full of procedures, data, and a bombardment of new faces inundating new recruits at lightning speed (Lawson, 2002). More emphasis in fact, is put on employees who leave an organization lavishing them with extravagant lunches, parties and other events celebrating their departure. When an employee is provided with a clear description of their job responsibilities, what is expected of them, consequences for violating those parameters, as well as the organization’s responsibilities to support the employee, they tend to perform their roles with more confidence and security.

Training-man

An effective leader must find ways to motivate employees to perform at higher levels. If their training methods (if any) are inefficient and inconsistent it will be indicated by employee low performance levels and their lack of respect for line-managers.  In addition, they must establish consequences for below par performances. Furthermore, employees that define their own operational methods that is satisfactory to their own needs means a better system must be devised so personnel operate consistently. An employer’s priority is to create and implement effective training programs designed to motivate employees to perform at higher levels. When employees are not properly oriented they tend to develop ineffective work habits. For the most effective results, employers must design programs to train employees and develop on-boarding programs consistently in the orientation process. Lawson (2002) suggested leaders implement training and on-boarding techniques that include a variety of educational processes because each adult learns differently. Training programs should offer a variety learning methods which may include: (a) visual learning using video, slides, photos, and other forms of media, (b) print learning using text, writing exercises that enable the absorption of written information, (c) aural learning from lectures and audiotapes, (d) interactive participation from group discussions and question and answer sessions with opportunities to talk and exchange ideas, opinions and responses, (e) tactile learning with hands on activities, and (f) kinesthetic learning that includes role playing and physical activities which involve the use of psycho-motor skills (Lawson, 2002). In conclusion, organizational managers need to design an effective training program that identifies employee expectations and define occupational parameters that meet the organization’s specifications. In short, leaders must develop systems to inspire high performance levels that include clearly defined consequences for not achieving those goals. These are a few strategies that can  help leaders improve ineffective employee performance conditions.

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References:
Lawson, K. (2002). New employee orientation training. Danvers, MA: ASTD Press.
Sims, D. (2011). Creative onboarding programs: Tools for energizing your orientation programs. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

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