Eastman Kodak Cash Flow Statement

Published December 16, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

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Early last week, I revealed the significance and meaning of cash flow statements. As we discovered, a corporation’s cash flow statements reveal a company’s ability to generate and allocate working capital. In fact Tracy and Tracy (2012) describe the movement of a company’s cash flow as the bloodline of a business due to its continual need to keep in circulation to avoid fatality (Tracy & Tracy, 2012). The focus of this post is a continuation of the analysis work of the Kodak Corporation’s financial condition provided from the data contained within their 2007 Annual Report. The analysis will reveal how well they managed their working capital. The study will also examine the following components that are contained within the cash flow statement: (a) the changes in balances that occurred with respect to Kodak’s assets and liability accounts such as inventory, accounts receivable, supplies, insurance, accounts payable and other unearned revenues; (b) adjustments that occurred as a result of their investing activities which include the purchase and sale of long term investments, equipment, and property; (c) changes that transpired from Kodak’s financing activities that also had an effect on the balances of long term liability and stockholders’ equity accounts due to such items as deferred income taxes and stock activity; and (d) the supplemental information provided from the notes that report the exchange of important items that did not involve cash such as income taxes and interest paid all of which may have had an effect on the flow of their working capital. The findings of this research will conclude that Kodak’s cash management strategies were effective in keeping enough operating capital available needed to operate during that time.

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The Significance of Cash Flow Statements

Companies risk running out of money and can go bankrupt without effective cash management strategies in place; plain and simple. Cash flow statements act as a tool to help analysts assess a company’s ability to generate and disperse their working capital. Friedlob and Plewa (1995) assert that in order for a company to run efficiently, they must budget their cash flow operations. Managing cash flow is a complex issue that requires today’s cash managers to have general knowledge in accounting practices and the ability to develop effective networking skills because of their extensive involvement in the company’s banking relationships, investment decisions, and forecasting decisions. For example, managing cash inflow from sales require that cash managers know how to extend credit and collect revenue so that it can be used effectively for functions like: (a) accelerating cash receipts to move cash faster using methods like fast bill pay, offering cash discounts and electronic transfers; (b) the planning and delaying of disbursements to gain the maximum use of cash; (c) forecasting cash inflows and outflows to avoid such events like overdrafts, deficiencies, and late payments; (d) investing idle cash to convert excess cash into short-term investments and back into cash again when they are needed; (e) reporting cash balances to make it convenient for managers to monitor and determine a company’s cash position; and (f) monitoring the cash flow system to assess whether the system is operating as designed and that goals are being achieved (Friedlob & Plewa, 1995). To ensure the cash is being used efficiently, managers require skills to help them maximize the earning potential of their organization and cash flow statements serve as tools that help them monitor and manage working capital.

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Kodak Annual Report Cash Flow Statement Analysis

An analysis of Kodak Company’s cash flow statement will reveal their ability to generate and disperse working capital they acquired from their operating, investing, and financing activities during a specified accounting period. Fraser and Ormiston (2010) explain that cash flow statements reveal the absolute dollar amounts of a company’s various accounts and are prepared by calculating all of the changes that are reflected in the balance sheet accounts, including cash; then itemizing those adjustments into cash flow categories to reflect the changes in their operating, financing, and investing activities (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). For example, a quick overview of Kodak’s Cash Flow Statement (see Exhibit A) shows that in 2005, Kodak generated $1,208 (in the millions) from operating activities that decreased about 21% in 2006 to $956 and then took a dramatic 67% drop in 2007 when they only showed that $314 was generated in cash from their operating activities. In addition, the cash statement reveals that the income generated during each of those years was reflected as a loss. In fact a closer look reveals that changes in cash occurred with positive balance results not from income that was generated, but were due to the adjustments that were made with respect to depreciation and amortization, restructuring and impairment charges, as well as increases in receivables and inventories that were reported. Regardless of the losses from income reported each year, the statement revealed that Kodak’s operating activities during that accounting period showed they generated enough cash to cover their outflow leaving them a positive ending balance each year.

Kodak’s cash flow statement also disclosed that in 2005, the net cash they collected from investing activities was reported as a loss of $1,304, (in the millions) but in 2006, they only showed a loss of $225. This means the cash they received from investing activities jumped up about 83%. In 2007 they reported a considerable profit gain of $2408. A closer look at the statement to identify the source of that gain points to their other investing activities provided from the financial notes of the report, that explained the gain was due to proceeds Kodak received from the sale of the Health Group and HPA businesses. In the meantime, the statement also shows that in 2005 the cash generated from Kodak’s financing activities revealed a profit of $533 while in 2006 those figures plummeted about 170% when they reported a loss of $947. The numbers dived even further in 2007, however, when they showed a 235% loss of $1,280.  The report revealed those losses were due to the payment of long term borrowing debt and shareholder dividends.

A general overview of the figures reported on Kodak’s cash flow statement revealed that the totals for operating, investing, and financing activities all showed positive balances at the end of each of those years. For example, in 2005 they showed a balance of $1665 that dropped down about 12% in 2006 to $1469. In 2007 however, the cash balance at the end of that year was reported at $2,947 which reflected an impressive increase of about 101% in only one year. This result occurred due to the profits Kodak generated from their investing activities and not because of their operating or financing activities with both reported considerable cash losses.

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Conclusion

Without the use of cash flow statements, businesses risk running out of money and going bankrupt. The Kodak Company’s cash flow statement disclosed that the increases and decreases which occurred had an effect on how the company utilized their working capital that were produced from their operating activities and highly liquid short-term marketable securities, that were also considered cash equivalents. In analyzing the figures on the statement strategists could assess Kodak’s financial condition to make more effective decisions about: (a) their ability to generate future cash flow, (b) their capability to meet their cash obligations, (c) what their future external financial needs might be, (d) their success and productivity in managing their investment activities, and (e) Kodak’s effectiveness in implementing financing and investment strategies. The findings of this research disclosed that Kodak was effective during that time with their investing strategies that but that they were struggling to show considerable profit gains from their operating and financing activities. The assessment of the cash flow statement that was conducted, deduced that the Kodak Company was effective at generating and allocating working capital during that accounting period because of their investing activities, however, more productive results were required from their operating and financing activities in order to help them maneuver the organization into a better position to achieve more profitable results.

Appendix A

Assignment 4 Exhibit A

(Kodak, 2008)

References

(2008). Kodak. Washington: Securities and Exchange Commission.

Averkamp, H. (2013). Cash flow statement. Retrieved November 21, 2013, from Accounting Coach: http://www.accountingcoach.com/cash-flow-statement/explanation/1

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Friedlob, G., & Plewa, F. (1995). Understanding cash flow. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Tracy, J., & Tracy, T. (2012). Cash flow for dummies. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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