Facing Conflicts

Published October 19, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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Are you, like many others, frustrated and tired of finding solutions to manage various conflicts, then discover you must face them again, repeatedly? That question was the inspiration for this week’s posts as we take a closer look into the nature of conflicts and how effective leaders are able to come up successful resolutions. In our research work, we will also examine whether a model exists that can yield more effective methods for achieving positives outcomes that are in alignment with reaching organizational goals; regardless of whether they are new challenges or the same ones that are recycled over and over again.

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To begin our analysis, we must first acknowledge that today’s global marketplace is multifaceted and culturally diverse. The atmosphere consists of people from assorted backgrounds and belief systems that come together in a work environment. It’s only natural that conflicts will arise when issues develop due to personalities that clash over a variety of reasons including: (a) ethnocentrism, (b) lack of trust between parties, (c) breakdown of communication systems, (d) workplace bullying, (e) interpersonal and intrapersonal conflicts, (f) ethical incompetence, and (g) lack of emotional intelligence, to name a few.

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In addition, conflict in a work arena also prevents workers from experiencing job satisfaction. In his book, Personal Conflict, Daniel Dana (2001) purports that, “Good decision-making helps to prevent conflict” (p. 2). In other words, leaders who can identify the source and level of a conflict, are in a better position to use this information to address problematic issues effectively and successfully to avoid consequences like employees who lack motivation, the slowing of productivity, and most important, damaging relationships which can ultimately lead to the dissolution of an organization.

Conflict-Management-Techniques

On Wednesday, we continue our discussion by conducting a closer analysis into the nature of a conflict as we cite and examine a few scenarios that helped contribute to the development of problematic issues. In addition, we will also examine how these problems may have been avoided with practices of accountability and transparency from more effective leadership. Until then … keep working on finding positive solutions and stay organized!

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“Conflict can and should be handled constructively; when it is, relationships benefit. Conflict avoidance is *not* the hallmark of a good relationship. On the contrary, it is a symptom of serious problems and of poor communication.”  ― Harriet B. Braiker,

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Coming this winter

For more information on Media Magic, our digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit:

Mayr’s Author Page.

References

Dana, D. (2001). Conflict Resolution (1st ed., p. 2). Madison, WI: CWL Publishing Enterprises.

5 comments on “Facing Conflicts

  • Our parents set us up for these life lessons. I thought I had done the work prior to making a long term commitment like marriage. Mine paralleled theirs when I released my personal power and enabled another individual to play the role of my father. That is what I did … I know better now!

    Like

  • I absolutely love your site.. Great colors & theme.
    Did you develop this site yourself? Please reply
    back as I’m attempting to create my own personal blog and would love to find out where you got this from or what the theme is
    called. Many thanks!

    Like

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