Annual Reports

All posts in the Annual Reports category

The Statement of Cash Flows

Published December 9, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

Water tap dripping dollar bills, Water waste concept

In order to operate a company successfully, leaders must implement cash flow management systems. This helps them work with banks and financial institutions more effectively to collect, borrow, and invest their revenue to conduct business efficiently and profitably. Tracy and Tracy (2012) assert that for owners, one of the most important elements in running a business is maintaining an adequate cash balance to make sure the company does not run out of money. To control cash inflow and outflow, managers devise systems to monitor and control these components. Cash flow statements provide information that lists how a company generated their cash and how they dispersed it. In this context, cash flow refers to the generating of incoming cash and the allocation of outgoing cash (Tracy & Tracy, 2012). Another way to look at the company’s cash flow is to consider it the bloodline of the company’s business affairs. In other words, a company’s cash needs to be in continuous circulation to avoid casualties. The first rule of thumb is to make sure it does not run out, the same way a person does not run out of blood, in spite of devising short term cash flow life-support solutions. In short, without some kind of effective cash management strategy in place, the outcomes can become extremely detrimental for a firm.

working-capital-cycle

Income statements reveal changes that transpire in the financial condition of an organization during a certain time frame but they do not explain all the changes that occur.  For example, Friedlob and Plewa (1995) purport that working capital accounts like inventory or accounts receivable have an impact on the company’s liquidity, however, this information does not appear on an income statement. Furthermore, a company’s financial condition can change considerably if their mortgage gets paid off or stock is issued in exchange for land. These are all examples of activities that do not affect the income statement (Friedlob & Plewa, 1995). To help identify these issues, cash flow statements provide information to analysts that disclose how changes in working capital affects cash from operations that produced income including: (a) delivering or producing goods for sale, (b) providing services, and (c) other transactions or events. In short, cash flow statements provide valuable information that discloses how a company managed cash inflows so that analysts can determine how they sought or granted credit, how they collected their revenue and whether it was allocated effectively.

example-cash-flow-statement

Cash flow statements reveal how well a company managed the earning potential of their cash. In order to continue operating, companies must have enough cash to run their business. This includes having enough revenue to purchase inventory to satisfy consumer needs, pay their debts and operating expenses, as well as meet the requirements of their investment activities.  Fraser and Ormiston (2010) explain that investing activities are also included on cash flow statements and provide valuable information on: (a) the purchase and sale of securities that are not cash equivalents and productive assets with long term benefits; and (b) lending money and loan collection revenue. Financing actions listed, on the other hand, include the borrowing of funds from creditors and paying off debt principals while obtaining resources from owners that provide them with returns on their investment (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). This information is significant to creditors, investors, and cash managers who are concerned with liquidity. Effective cash management systems help companies avoid cash flow issues to ensure they are generating a healthy stream of cash required to operate efficiently and earn a profit. An income statement alone does not report how much of sales revenue collected were in the form of cash during a specific accounting period. In addition, the bottom line profit numbers on income statements do not indicate the increase of cash for making a profit. In reality, a company’s cash flow can be about the same, or alternatively can be considerably higher or lower than the profit figures  that are reported on income statements. It is for this reason that analysts look to cash flow statements to get a better picture of how a company utilized their working capital.

References:

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Friedlob, G., & Plewa, F. (1995). Understanding cash flow. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Tracy, J., & Tracy, T. (2012). Cash flow for dummies. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Analyzing an Income Statement

Published December 6, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

money

The goal of analyzing an income statement is to determine whether a company is operating effectively and making a profit.  Alvarez and Fridson (2011) suggest that to achieve this objective, the analyst must draw their conclusions by comparing the information from an earlier period as well as from examining statements of other companies in the industry. This helps give a better picture as to how well an organization is performing and how well they measure in terms of their competition (Alvarez & Fridson, 2011). To help us understand the concepts more effectively, we can examine the data provided from the Elf Corporation’s Income statement (see Exhibit A) to ascertain whether the figures reveal overall if they had better sales in 2010 than in 2008. For example, the statement shows that their sales figures increased 18% in 2009 from the 2008 figures and jumped another 8% in 2010. This means the company showed a total sales increase of 27% during that three year period. In the meantime, the cost of goods sold reflects the same percentage increases during that period. This indicates that the sales increase resulted from the amount of units sold, not due to a higher cost of goods. In addition, the statement shows that they decreased their advertising expenses. In 2008 for instance, the company invested 14% of their revenue to advertising costs that decreased to 11% in 2009 and dropped down to 7% in 2010. This may suggest that their brand may have become more recognizable and management decided to reduce advertising costs to maximize profit margins. The statement also exhibits that there was no change in the amount of expenses that were allocated for administrative costs which remained the same rate during that three year period. However, administrative costs expose a 4% decrease over that time because of the rising sales levels.

Debtlogo

Fraser and Ormiston (2010) explain that a company’s operating profit margin measures the overall performance of the company’s operations and provides the basis for determining the success of a firm (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). The Elf Corporation’s income statement for instance, indicates a steady increase during that three year period with respect to their operating profits. This signals an increase from 18% of the company’s sales revenue in 2008 to 29% in 2010. This ratio suggests that the company experienced a steady strengthening in their returns. Other expenses incurred where interest amounts paid on the firm’s debts. For example, in 2008, the company paid 5% in interest expenses which rose to 8% in 2009 and 10% in 2010. This means that as profits rose, more funds were available for debt commitments. In addition, the statement also shows that the revenue the company collected before income taxes also reflected a steady increase during that three year period. For instance, in 2010 Elf’s earnings revealed an increase of 24% from that of 2008. Finally, the last item on the income statement shows the company’s bottom line, their earnings or the net income they profited after all revenue and expenses were deducted. These figures indicate a steady increase that began at 6% in 2008 and rose to 9% by 2010. My brief analysis of the Elf Corporation’s income statement concluded that the company continued to show a steady increase in profit from the 2008 to 2010 accounting period.

Exhibit A

Elf Corporation Income Statements for the Years Ending December 31

ELF

References:

Alvarez, F., & Fridson, M. (2011). Financial statement analysis: A practioner’s guide. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education

 

Income Statements

Published December 4, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

Multiple-Streams-Of-Income2

Corporations exist for the benefit of their shareholders. Comprehending financial statements is an essential skill that can help investors and creditors make more effective decisions with respect to investment management and commercial lending. Alvarez and Fridson (2011) explain that because corporate financial statements are difficult to understand strategists must have a comprehensive knowledge of how to read the data that is contained within these financial statements. The objective of these reports is not to educate the public about a firm’s financial situation. Their goal rather, is to maximize the wealth of their shareholders. In other words, financial statements serve to help leaders develop more effective methods to maximize shareholder wealth while reducing the cost (or interest rate) at which they can borrow and in turn, sell shares of stock at higher rates to generate more wealth for the shareholders (Alvarez & Fridson, 2011). In short, the main objective of financial reports is to help corporations acquire inexpensive capital.

download (1)

Financial report Income statements provide a picture that helps analysts determine a company’s profitability. Ittelson (2009) postulates that in order to understand the information that is contained within these statements the reader must first have a better understanding of the item terms they contain. For instance, the terms sales and revenue are identified as the income statement’s top line and are used to measure the capital a company receives from their consumers. The terms profitsearnings, and income on the other hand, are used to measure the company’s bottom line and reflects the amount of capital that is left over as revenue after expenses are deducted. Simply put, revenue is the top line of the income statement while income is considered the bottom line (Ittelson, 2009). Understanding the these terms more clearly can help make it easier for individuals to extract information that is pertinent to them.

1000hrs_Operating_Performance3

Sales, in the meantime, are considered a major source of revenue for a firm and income statements are utilized to provide analysts a means to measure and assess a company’s operating performance because they help paint a better picture of a firm’s earnings. Fraser and Ormiston (2010) explain for instance, that earnings on income statements provide data for several years. This allows strategists to observe and compare changes and trends that occur over a given period of time (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). For example, there are two significant causes that can effect changes in sales numbers: (a) price increases and (b) liquidity of sales units. When a company’s sales increase for instance, analysts must determine whether the change occurred due to price increases, volume activity changes, or a combination of both. In other words, strategists use this information to determine whether sales figures are increasing due to price hikes, the movement or liquidity of large volumes of units, or whether it resulted from of a combination of both factors. Generally, as a rule, higher earnings result from moving large units of stock. Another reason could be that higher prices were implemented to keep up with the expanding rates of inflation. Sales figures can also become affected by a cost flow assumption that some accountants used to value inventory. For example, some companies use the last-in, first-out (LIFO) method to report sales and inventory. This strategy allows the last purchases a company makes during the year appear as an expense on their income statements and is reflected on the statement to show higher-quality production earnings. Because of these kinds of strategies, income statements must be assessed accurately to help analysts determine the true picture of the revenue, expenses, and earnings of an organization with an awareness of the imperfections of the accounting system implemented by the manipulation of bookkeepers intended on distorting a firm’s economic reality to impress potential investors.

References:

Alvarez, F., & Fridson, M. (2011). Financial statement analysis: A practioner’s guide. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Ittelson, T. (2009). Financial statements: A step-by-step guide. Amazon Digital Services, Inc.

Eastman Kodak Balance Sheet Analysis

Published December 2, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

Accounting.

A corporation’s balance sheet provides significant data about a company’s assets and liabilities and divulges the true nature of their financial condition. Makoujy (2010) contends that balance sheets are the financial statements which provide an overview of a company’s assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity. These documents disclose how much capital is brought into an organization and how it is allocated to satisfy the firm’s liabilities and owner’s equity commitments (Makoujy, 2010). This information is important for helping investors deduce a company’s risk levels by analyzing the profit and loss measurements they provide. It also gives creditors an indication of a firm’s financial condition from the short-term liquidity ratios they disclose. The focus of this research continues with the analysis work centered on the Kodak Company’s financial condition provided from their 2007 Annual Report. This study will take a closer look at the report’s balance sheets to reveal how strategists determine the firm’s net financial position by the information provided in the statements that summarize Kodak’s assets, liabilities, and owner’s equity. The research will disclose how the data from the balance sheets help investors and creditors in their financial decision making by examining the figures that revealed the truth about Kodak’s operating condition and overall net worth during that given point in time. The findings of this research, from evaluating the information provided in the Kodak Company’s balance sheet statements, will determine that the company’s overall financial condition and their stability as a business during that time was below par.

The Balance Sheet’s Function

The true nature of a company’s balance sheet that is provided their annual reports, serves to summarize the company’s assets, liabilities, and shareholder equity during a specified period of time. To understand these concepts more clearly, it is important to comprehend that all the possessions of a company (assets) are either owned free and clear (equity) or were purchased by acquiring debt (liability). To measure a company’s performance levels, Skonieczny (2012) asserts that their balance sheets must follow one important equation in that the total amount of assets must equal the total amounts of both the company’s liabilities and equity or net worth. In other words, the accounting figures of a balance sheet must mathematically balance out by adhering to the following equation:

download

For example, when the Kodak Company makes a down payment for property, equipment, or any other expenditure meant to help with the operation of the firm, that payment would be classified as an example of equity. In the meantime, the mortgage payments on their facilities are considered a form of debt (Skonieczny, 2012). Balance sheets can be intimidating and difficult to comprehend for those who are not proficient in mathematics or are untrained and lack bookkeeping skills. To help those that are unfamiliar traverse safely through these accounting waters, one efficient instrument that is used for scrutinizing a balance sheet is the common-size balance sheet. Common-size balance sheets provide the same information only rather than disclosing the actual figures, the values are provided as percentages with a common denominator. This strategy enables investors and creditors to compare account sizes as percentage rates over a period of time. This kind of balance sheet is also ideal for helping investors identify and observe trends.

kodak-logo

Kodak Company’s Annual Report Findings

Even though they may be difficult to comprehend, balances sheets provide vital information that creditors use to measure a company’s short-term liquidity. Fraser and Ormiston (2010) postulate that the information provided on the balance sheet with respect to a company’s inventory is an important element in the examination of a company’s liquidity. This component is significant, for instance, because creditors can determine the ability of an organization to meet currency needs as they arise (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). In addition these figures can offer insight as to how well a company is performing during a certain period in time. For instance, Kodak’s balance sheet (Exhibit A) indicates that in 2006 their current assets (including cash equivalents, short term investments, accounts receivable and inventories) totaled about $5.5 million, while in 2007 that figure rose to $6. However, the total assets reported in 2006 were much higher ($14.3 million) than they were in 2007 where it dropped down about a million dollars ($13.6 million). This indicates that the long-term assets values increased during that time period which may have resulted from the accumulated depreciation values.

Shareholders are interested in a company’s balance sheet because it provides valuable information that can help them determine a company’s risk levels. For example, Kodak’s balance sheet (Exhibit A) indicates that in 2007, their assets totaled about $14 million while their liabilities reflected a total amount of about $11 million. To help investors ascertain the ratio measurements they may look to a common-size balance sheet to give them a simpler overview of their financial condition. Using this strategy analysts would conclude that during that given period, the Kodak Company committed a substantive percentage (around 78%) of their total assets on meeting their debt obligations leaving only 22% that was allocated towards shareholder equity. Those figures are a slight improvement however, from 2006, whose figures during that year disclosed that the company committed 90% of their total assets to meet their debt requirements. To investors and creditors these figures represent a high level of risk and a clear indication that although they were making progress, the Kodak Company was still not in a healthy financial condition during this period in time.

Conclusion

Balance sheets measure a firm’s profitability and provide shareholders important information on current and future risk levels. It is for this reason that stockholders and owners require a system to help them measure a company’s performance levels in a periodic manner. The balance sheets help provide investors and creditors with information that allows them to determine whether a company is operating in a profitable manner which also helps them predict whether stock prices will rise or fall. A closer examination of the Kodak Company’s balance sheets indicates the risks they took were considerable. However, it also revealed that their strategies and cutbacks were slowly proving effective which allowed them to keep the company operational. In conclusion, the findings of this study’s assessment with respect to the Kodak Company’s balance sheet provided from their 2007 Annual Report, deduced that although the Kodak Company was making a valiant effort to maintain operations, they were still struggling in their efforts to achieve profitable goals during that given time.

Exhibit A

Kodak Balance Sheet Exhibit A Assignment 2

(Kodak, 2008)

References

(2008). Kodak. Washington: Securities and Exchange Commission.

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Makoujy, R. (2010). How to read a balance sheet: The bottom line. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Skonieczny, M. (2012). The basics of understanding financial statements. Schaumburg, IL: Investment Publishing.

Understanding the Balance Sheet

Published November 25, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

8-8 (1)

Making investments in a company’s stock is a significant event in an individual’s life because an uninformed decision can become quite costly. To make the most informed decisions, individuals should conduct extensive research to help them make choices they feel secure about. To achieve this, many people can look to a company’s annual report for more insight into their financial condition. Roth (2008) explains that a company’s financial statements contained within their annual report are a significant asset to help individuals who are looking to make a sound investment in a company’s stock. They help people make better assessments by learning about a company’s strategies, financial health, and even information about their behavioral and moral values (Roth, 2008).  For this blog post, we will address our fictitious friend Liz who is confused about the true state of the Target Corporation’s financial condition (See Exhibit A below). This is a brand she is considering investing in because of her emotional attachment to it. However, the figures her buddy Tom disclosed upon reviewing their balance sheet suggested that investing in Target was not a sound idea because of the substantial percentage amount (74%) they invested of their total assets as risky obligations. Tom’s percentage rate caused Liz confusion because her calculations arrived at a different figure which was lower and amounted to 65%.

images

To help Liz with her confusion, we must explain how Tom arrived at his position. First, let’s analyze how Liz calculated her figures. For example, at the end of their fiscal year in February, 2008, the Target Corporation had liabilities (including current and long-term) that rounded off to about $29 million, while their asset totals came to about $45 million. To help Liz better understand these debt structure figures, she looked to a common-size balance sheet formula to translate these numbers into percentages. By taking the $29 million liabilities figure and dividing it by the $45 million asset figures, Liz came up with 65% as amount of debt Target has accrued. Tom, however, arrived at a figure that was nearly 10% higher which confused Liz because her math equations incontrovertibly added up.

Calculating-Percentages

What Liz did not take into consideration in her calculations, however, were the company’s commitments and contingencies contained within the notes of the report.  Fraser and Ormiston (2010) suggest that even though the balance sheet may not reflect a dollar amount in this category, this disclosure is intended to draw attention to the information that is located in the notes of the financial statements. These notes are significant because they list the commitments of a company’s contractual obligations that may still have an adverse effect on their financial outlook. Because companies engage in complicated financial reporting procedures that include such things as product financing, sales of receivables with recourse, limited partnerships and joint-ventures, that are not required to be included on the balance sheets, they are however, provided in the notes (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). These are complicated components that are difficult to comprehend but play an important role in painting a full picture of the company’s operations. In other words, there are other factors that are not reported on a company’s balance sheet with unpredictable outcomes that can have an effect on Target’s future liabilities. In other words, Liz also needed to include in her calculations the figures provided in the commitments and contingency notes as well. These notes revealed for instance, that Target also had further contractual obligations and operating leases that extended beyond the year 2008 which included lease payments of $1,721 million with options that could extend the terms of the lease. Their contractual obligation payments also consisted of interest rates and a $98 million commitment in legally binding lease payments for the planned openings of future facilities that were scheduled to occur in 2008 or later. Tom arrived at his additional 10% figure because he factored in the information of these provisions to his equations and Liz did not.

Exhibit A

Target Example

References:

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Roth, R. (2008). The writers guide to annual reports. Atlanta, GA: Booksurge.com.

The Balance Sheet

Published November 22, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

img6

What is a Balance Sheet?

Balance sheets are financial statements contained within a company’s annual report. The information provided on a balance sheet reveals what a company owns, how much it owes and what remains in the form of equity for its shareholders. Skonieczny (2012) explains that a company’s balance sheet discloses their financial position on a particular day like the end of the year or the first quarter and are based on the following important equation:

assets = liabilities + equity

The reason it is called a balance sheet is due to the fact that the accounting equation has to balance out at all times (Skonieczny, 2012). This means that the assets must always be an equal amount that reflects the companies liabilities and equity. In other words, all possessions (assets) are either owned free and clear (equity) and were purchased by acquiring debt (liabilities). For example, a down payment on a company building is an example of equity, while the monthly payments are an example of debt. The information provided on a balance sheet is comprised of the company’s: (a) assets, including current assets, long and short term investments, property, plant and equipment, plus any other tangible and intangible assets; (b) liabilities such as accounts payable, salaries, interest and taxes paid, bank notes, loans, mortgage obligations and other debts; and (c) stockholder’s equity including capital stock and retained earnings.

BALANCE-SHEET

What is a common sized balance sheet?

Makoujy (2010) asserts that an expense occurs when value is lost and that balance sheets help strategists understand not only what a company possesses during a certain period of time, but how much it has grown or lost during that time (Makoujy, 2010). In the meantime, common-size balance sheets are helpful instruments that allow companies to assess their financial situation. Fraser and Ormiston (2010) explain that a common-size balance sheet specifically serves as a tool designed for vertical ratio analysis as a means of measuring and comparing various components that have a common denominator (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). In other words, it is a kind of balance sheet that shows each dollar amount as a percentage of a common number. This allows analysts to compare account sizes over time as the balance sheet grows and the figures change. They are also effective for identifying and observing trends.

commonbalancesheet_r

How to create a common sized balance sheet?

To create a common-sized balance sheet, analysts must convert each asset, liability, and shareholders’ account to a percentage amount so that the balance sheet reflects that the total assets are equal to the total liabilities and shareholders’ equity figures. To create a common-sized balance sheet the amount of total assets must be determined first, like $100,000 for instance. Next the amount of each asset is divided by the amount of total assets. Then each result amount is multiplied by 100 to establish the common-size percentage for each asset. If the company’s cash account, for example, is $30,000, you would divide $30,000 by $100,000 to obtain a figure of 0.3. You would then multiply that 0.3 figure by 100 to arrive at 30% as the common-size percentage for the cash account. In other words, the company’s cash account makes up 30% of the total assets. The same formula is applied to determine the percentage amounts of the company’s liabilities and shareholders’ equity which amount should total the $100,000 figure to balance out the total assets.

Monday’s post will focus on understanding how investors use the information on a balance sheet to determine whether a company would make a good investment. Until then … have a great weekend everyone!

********

References:

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Makoujy, R. (2010). How to read a balance sheet: The bottom line. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Skonieczny, M. (2012). The basics of understanding financial statements. Schaumburg, IL: Investment Publishing.

 

The Eastman Kodak Company 2007 Annual Report – Initial Analysis Conclusion

Published November 20, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

kodak-logo

Part one revealed Kodak’s rise to success. In this post, we look into the components that altered that status. Snyder (2013) asserts that many believed Kodak’s problems began when digital technology was introduced, his research, however, disclosed that their problems developed further back. For example, when Kodak competitor Polaroid introduced a camera that developed photos in sixty seconds, Kodak focused the energy of their R&D engineers to come up with a similar product. Their attempt to mimic another company’s technology not only tarnished their image, it caused them to lose focus on the market. This allowed Japan’s Fuji Corporation to slowly dominate the industry when they released a 400-speed film product before Kodak. Later, when Kodak introduced their version of the Polaroid instamatic camera, this copy-cat strategy resulted in a costly lawsuit that was filed and won by the Polaroid company for patent infringement (Snyder, 2013). In short, Kodak’s blind ambition, poor investment choices, and an attitude that they were too big fail, ultimately clouded their judgment. Consequently, every attempt they made to salvage the company’s image in hopes of reclaiming their title as a dominant force in the marketplace only cost them more as they continued their downward spiral and evidenced from the data reflected in the financial statements of their annual reports.

download (1)

Annual Report Findings

Even though PR fluff can try to disguise the true nature of a company’s operational health, the financial statements contained in their annual reports can help analysts discover the truth about a company’s financial condition and overall performance. Mattioli and Spector (2011) postulate, that in spite of their financial hardships, Kodak was committed to meet their obligations to suppliers and creditors (Mattioli & Spector, 2011). For example, an initial assessment of the 2007 Annual Report’s financial statements which include the (a) balance sheet, (b) income statement, and (c) cash flow balances, (see Exhibit A below) indicate that for the period from 2005 to 2007 Kodak was making a genuine effort to salvage their firm even though profits continued to steadily decline. In 2007, the gross profit figures of $2,516 (represented in millions for instance), were not far off from the figures reported in 2005 ($2,531). In the meantime, the balance sheet indicates that their assets showed an increase in value which could suggest they felt confident enough make further investments to continue moving forward with day-to-day operations.

The net profit figures from the income statements, however, suggest a drastic fluctuation during that three year period beginning by showing a loss of $1,261 net profit in 2005 (in the millions), another loss of $601 in 2006. and finally in 2007 they showed a gain in the amount of $676. Although this indicates profit rather than loss during that three year period, it still did not give shareholders confidence in the company’s performance outcomes. In the meantime, the cash flow figures confirm a steady decrease during that time which further confirmed that the company was not performing well. Signs of trouble in the Kodak Company were further apparent in that their stock activity also fluctuated considerably during that time. For instance, at the end of 2005, Kodak’s stock price was valued at $72.24 a share. In 2006, the stock went up to $81.33, perhaps because of their attempts to seek out loans to help build shareholder confidence. However, by the end of 2007, Kodak’s shares dropped lower than they were in 2005 to a mere $70.23 per share. This indicates that in spite of their efforts to resurrect the company, they were still struggling considerably.

The information gathered from Kodak’s financial statements, such as: (a) assets that dropped to a value of $13,659 from $14,320, (b) accounts payable liabilities went from $12,932 to $10,630, and (c) shareholder equities that decreased from $14,320 to $13,659, revealed that incoming revenue and shareholders’ equity showed a steady decrease during that accounting period.  Based on the findings of this initial analysis, these figures divulge that during that time, the Kodak Company did not exhibit the performance levels of a healthy enterprise.

kodak_printdock3

Conclusion

Comprehensive financial analyses help forecast a company’s financial health from the information provided in their annual reports. The significant financial data and ratios that are contained in them help provide strategists key information to determine industry trends. Friedlob and Welton (2008) assert that the key to understanding an annual report is that they are designed to help satisfy the needs of many individuals including shareholders, creditors, economists, analysts, and suppliers (Friedlob & Welton, 2008). The findings of this study revealed that Kodak Eastman’s financial troubles began years ago because company leaders lost sight on the key component that made them a giant in their industry: to provide innovative high quality products. Synder (2013) submits there many more reasons that led to Kodak’s slow demise which included such factors as: (a) their focus on copying Polaroid’s innovations, (b) their abandonment of the 35mm camera market, and (c) making costly acquisitions like Sterling Drug for $5.1 billion with no experience in managing a pharmaceutical company (Snyder, 2013). These short sighted decisions cost them greatly in the long run and were reflected in their overall performance outcomes revealed in the 2007 Annual Report which confirmed their slow and steady decline in revenue and stock equity. In addition, the legal proceedings section of the notes contained in the report indicates that they were involved in a variety of investigations and in various stages of litigation which analysts knew could also produce adverse effects on Kodak’s future financial condition.

The initial examination and assessment from the findings of this research conclude that the Kodak Company was financially unstable during that time and is supported by the declining numbers disclosed from their annual report. In short, the financial figures revealed that the entrepreneurial decisions corporate leaders made at the firm yielded unimpressive performance outcomes due to many factors, including: (a) tunnel vision strategies that were focused on out-maneuvering competitors, (b) exorbitant acquisitions with no experience in how to manage them, and (c) a costly lawsuits from Polaroid and others that helped tarnish their image. In the meantime, Eastman Kodak has been working diligently to find ways to salvage the strategic errors of leadership that led to their bankruptcy after 120 years of public service. Mourdoukoutas (2013) explains that since that time, Kodak sold a large portion of the business, their patent portfolio, and laid-off most of their staff members to lighten the debt they carried. In addition, their R&D division is now focused on creating new products which is what the company excelled at when it was initially founded (Mourdoukoutas, 2013). In the long run it would appear that Kodak’s over confidence and lack of effective leadership with innovative decision making may have played a role that resulted in their empire systematically crumbling and hopefully they are on the road to a more prosperous venture.

Exhibit A 

Cover sheet exhibit A

(figures provided from Eastman Kodak Company 2007 Annual Report, 2008)

********

References

(2008). Eastman Kodak Company 2007 Annual Report. U.S. Federal Government, Securities and Exchange Commission. Washington: Securities and Exchange Commission.

Eastman Kodak Company. (2013). Retrieved November 1, 2013, from cobrands.hoovers.com: http://cobrands.hoovers.com/company/Eastman_Kodak_Company/rfhiff-1-1njhxk.html

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Friedlob, G., & Welton, R. (2008). Keys to reading annual report. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series.

Mattioli, D., & Spector, M. (2011, October 25). Eastman Kodak Seeks Rescue Financing. The Wall Street Journal, 4.

Mourdoukoutas, P. (2013, November 2). Can Eastman Kodak rise again? Retrieved November 3, 2013, from forbes.com: http://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2013/11/02/can-eastman-kodak-rise-again/

Roth, R. (2008). The writers guide to annual reports. Atlanta, GA: Booksurge.com.

Snyder, P. (2013). Is this something George Eastman would have done? New York, NY: CreateSpace Independent Publishing.

The Eastman Kodak Company 2007 Annual Report – Initial Analysis Part 1

Published November 18, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

kodak-logo

A corporation’s annual report helps provide shareholders a glimpse into that company’s overall performance and financial effectiveness. Strategic analysts use this information to measure profit and loss as well as help forecast a company’s financial health by examining the significant data and financial ratios that are provided from these reports. Roth (2008) explains their purpose simply in that the job of a company’s annual report is to share their story as a unified message (Roth, 2008). To better comprehend a company’s financial health from their corporate annual reports, the focus of my ongoing research efforts throughout this six week journey will examine the various components contained within these financial tomes to help determine whether a company is sustainable or not. As an example to illustrate these concepts step-by-step, my analysis will include an ongoing examination of the 2007 Annual Report of the troubled Eastman Kodak Company – the photo imaging firm that was established in the late 1800s by George Eastman. To help present a clearer picture of the company’s activities and overall functionality, the study will draw information from the financial statements to evaluate such elements as assets, liabilities, and stockholders’ equity to help determine Kodak’s viability as a business. The findings of this research will disclose how the data obtained from the company’s annual report reveals significant information that can help strategists determine, plan, and forecast the firm’s overall performance and financial health.

vkodak1

A Brief History of Kodak

The true nature of a company’s image can be ascertained through a comprehensive analysis that is provided by their annual reports. Fraser and Ormiston (2010) purport that in order to comprehend how to navigate through the vast amount of data provided in the annual reports, familiarity with accounting is helpful (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). For the purpose of this research, to better understand where the Eastman Kodak company was headed, it is important to first understand how they emerged as a major player in the photo imaging industry. Kodak initially became successful when they introduced their first camera, a small easy-to-use device with film that took up to 100 photos. Soon after, they added the home movie camera, film, and projectors to their product line. By the early 1930s, Kodak dominated the marketplace when they introduced and released an innovative component called Kodachrome, a new technology that added the richness of color to their film products in 1935 (Eastman Kodak Company, 2013). This was a hugely successful entrepreneurial maneuver, one that secured their position at the top of their industry. Since that time they continued to expand with additional imaging technology items and services they added to their product line including inkjet printers, digital photo frames, printing kiosks, online imaging services, and scanners, to name a few.

414C6YT0RML

For many decades Kodak enjoyed enormous success and dominated the marketplace. However, over confident leadership, poor strategic planning, and a complacent attitude may have been the cause of their slow demise. Part two of this post will dive further into what may have caused Kodak’s financial problems and examine their report to give us clues.

Until then ….

********

References

(2008). Eastman Kodak Company 2007 Annual Report. U.S. Federal Government, Securities and Exchange Commission. Washington: Securities and Exchange Commission.

Eastman Kodak Company. (2013). Retrieved November 1, 2013, from cobrands.hoovers.com: http://cobrands.hoovers.com/company/Eastman_Kodak_Company/rfhiff-1-1njhxk.html

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Friedlob, G., & Welton, R. (2008). Keys to reading annual report. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series.

Mattioli, D., & Spector, M. (2011, October 25). Eastman Kodak Seeks Rescue Financing. The Wall Street Journal, 4.

Mourdoukoutas, P. (2013, November 2). Can Eastman Kodak rise again? Retrieved November 3, 2013, from forbes.com: http://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2013/11/02/can-eastman-kodak-rise-again/

Roth, R. (2008). The writers guide to annual reports. Atlanta, GA: Booksurge.com.

Snyder, P. (2013). Is this something George Eastman would have done? New York, NY: CreateSpace Independent Publishing.

Financial Statements

Published November 15, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

gg61704648

Financial statements contain an enormous amount of valuable information with respect to a company’s financial position, the success of their operations and provides a clear insight of their future potential. They help investors make effective decisions because they answer such questions as: (a) would an investment yield an attractive return; (b) what is the level of risk they pose; (c) should existing inventory be liquidated, and (d) are cash flows sufficient to support the firm’s borrowing needs. For example, because of changes in the economy as well as advances in technology in how music products are now marketed and sold, someone looking to invest in a record company like the one I used to work at, Capitol-EMI Records (CER), would look to the financial statements of their annual report to help them determine how well the company is performing.

In it’s hey day, CER was considered a prestigious primary market record label that is still recognized worldwide today. It is part of the EMI Music Group and is a subsidiary of the Universal Music Group. The company was founded in 1942 by American lyricist, songwriter, and recording artist Johnny Mercer, who wrote the famous lyrics to Henry Mancini’s Moon River that later went on to become the trademark song for singer Andy Williams  (The Johnny Mercer Research Guide, 2012). Throughout the years, CER has consisted of an impressive artist roster including such mega stars of the past like The Beatles, Kenny Rogers, David Bowie, Tina Turner, Bob Seger, as well as the giants of today like Katy Perry and Coldplay. In the global marketplace, CER distributes a wide genre of music including, pop, rock, classical, jazz, R&B, and hip-hop through various sister labels. With offices around the globe, the Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood, California is their most famous landmark.

EMI-Capitol_Music

Investors that are looking to figure out how well the company is performing today would seek answers from the company’s annual report. Friedlob and Welton (2008) explain that the key to comprehending any annual report is understanding that they are developed to help satisfy the many needs of a variety of different people including shareholders, creditors, potential shareholders and creditors, as well as economists, financial analysts, and suppliers  (Friedlob & Welton, 2008).

EMI’s Annual Report provides information that discloses how well the company is performing, their financial condition, and where the company is headed. Fraser and Ormiston (2010) purport that segmenting the financial information helps direct individuals to the data that is relevant to them (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). For example, a creditor may want to peruse the cash flow statements to gain insight into the company’s liquidity. The Consolidated Financial Statements however, would be useful to investors because they provide details on all the company’s financial branches that reveal the true nature of their net worth. Any person therefore, looking to invest in the Capitol-EMI family, would need to take into consideration the information provided from these consolidated statements. They are important documents that will help investors decipher how well all of the company’s affiliates are performing to give them a clearer a picture of its net worth.

References:

(2011). EMI annual review 2009/2010. Finances. Hollywood: Maltby Capital Ltd.

The Johnny Mercer Research Guide. (2012). Retrieved October 30, 2013, from The Johnny Mercer Foundation: http://www.johnnymercerfoundation.org/initiatives-charities/for-researchers/johnny-mercer-research-guide/

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Friedlob, G., & Welton, R. (2008). Keys to reading annual report. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series.

The Annual Report

Published November 13, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

aed0e44504e7f7a01601fc51a8bb0784

Today begins our six week adventure navigating through topics that will help us understand how business owners can make the most effective the financial decisions that help them run their companies more efficiently with higher profits. Dr. Felix Lao (2013) explains that:

“The measurement of accounting information is critical to the owners of the business to make judgments about the value of assets or liabilities owed by the business. It accurately measures profit or loss made by the business in a particular period. Shareholders can make decisions and evaluate about the future of an organization by looking at past and current financial data. It helps management actually manage the operation by looking at functional units as well as overall performance and effectiveness to plan. The information provides critical tools that reveal an accurate and true view of the financial position of the company to ensure that risks are adequately and appropriately taken and the resources are invested well.”

To give us a better understanding of the financial condition of a company, my research work will take a closer examination of the extensive financial information that is contained within a firm’s financial tome known as their Annual Report. Take for example a company like Target that does a fabulous job selling products to customers.  A good number of consumers are so pleased with this corporation’s performance in fact, that many consider buying shares in the company’s stock.

To find out more about their financial situation investors will look to their annual reports to help them determine how well the company is performing.  Unfortunately, more questions arise regarding the content of these reports because most individuals are not trained in deducing the information they contain to help them comprehend the true nature of the company’s financial health.  Technical questions about the firm’s financial condition and performance cannot easily be addressed unless the key elements in the annual report are understood. Investors must acknowledge that in order to figure out how well a company is doing they must look to the company’s financial statements because those are the documents that can provide details that address the following information: (a) where a company’s money came from, (b) how it was spent, and (c) where it currently stands.

2011-annual-report-finances

Typically, there are four kinds of financial statements in a company’s annual report: (a) the balance sheets that disclose what a company owns and owe, (b) the income statements that reveal incoming revenue and outgoing expenditures, (c) the cash flow statements which show the exchange of currency transactions, and (d) the statements of shareholders’ equity which reveal the changes in shareholder interests (Beginners guide to financial statements, 2007). Individuals who can comprehend the information these statements contain are in a better position to understand the company’s financial condition.

The financial statements in a company’s annual report are useful for many reasons. For example, Fraser and Ormiston (2010) explain that they not only reveal how well the firm is performing, they also show whether or not it is providing opportunities for growth and future advancements  (Fraser & Ormiston, 2010). The enormous volume of information in these reports can  be intimating to the untrained eye. To help with an overview of the most important aspects, each report contains a 10-K form which serves as a summary that highlight the report’s key components.

Smart investors will look to the contents of the firm’s annual report to help paint a clear picture of what a company is doing, what it claimed it was going to do, what it actually did, and most significantly, what it intends to do next. Roth (2008) also points out that annual reports are significantly more important in today’s economy because they have become a platform for which organizations use to expand their investments, launch new products, create more effective marketing strategies, address behavioral or morale issues, and can even alter a company’s strategic direction (Roth, 2008).  In other words, the information provided in them are beneficial to investors and creditors whose interpretation of the contents contained within these reports can help them assess the firm’s viability.

References:

Beginners guide to financial statements. (2007, February 5). Retrieved October 28, 2013, from U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission: http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/begfinstmtguide.htm

Fraser, L., & Ormiston, A. (2010). Understanding financial statements. Pearson Education.

Lao, F. (2013). Ashford University. Clinton, IA.

Roth, R. (2008). The writers guide to annual reports. Atlanta, GA: Booksurge.com.