corporate ethics

All posts tagged corporate ethics

The Ethics of Handling Strong Emotions

Published July 28, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair
4.Ini-Penyebab-Pengantin-Baru-Cepat-Bosan-Setelah-Menikah.1

Many of us initially learned how to deal with strong emotions in our home environment. Those who had the most influence were the elders and guardians in roles as disciplinarians. As a result, we learned how to deal with strong emotions from the rules they implemented in addition to observing the actions that revealed their own coping skills when it came to handling strong emotions. To put it another way, when we are young, impressionable, and still learning how to navigate the world around us, caretakers that use yelling and screaming as a strategy, for example, teach children that screaming and yelling is an accepted method for handling strong emotions. However, this strategy rarely yields positive outcomes. In fact, it typically leads to the escalation of unmanageable levels of emotion.

Anger 2

As we grow and process different life changing events, especially those powerful enough to shift our views, our emotions become heightened. In my ebook, Ethics in the Real World (2013), I discuss this further and explain how some situations can produce positive experiences for us, such as promotions, marriages, and the birth of our children; while other experiences can produce negative outcomes, such as abuse, divorce, natural disasters, and so on (Berry, 2013). When families find themselves in a crisis situation where heightened emotions have reached uncontrollable or unmanageable levels, many will seek out additional support from other avenues that can include the clergy, spiritual communities, schools, or other kinds of family support programs. There are a variety of different support systems that can provide beneficial assistance for helping families. Many of them also provide higher levels of education that include training in practices to help support the development of coping skills.

iop

Ethics also play a big role in helping us handle emotions. For example, to place awareness on ethics in the decision-making process, it is important that we first identify, then transmit with clarity, what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior. In addition, we must also articulate clearly, a code of ethics and engage in consistent action when implementing consequences for misbehavior and misconduct. This not only sets the standard, these are instrumental strategies for building and supporting an ethical culture.

DSC04871

Plum Village Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh (2012) asserts that keeping open communication is also an essential component for managing strong emotions. Hanh further explains that there are practices that can be developed to help us handle strong emotions. The key is learning how to perform these practices when we are confident and feeling great, before our emotions are heightened. This is beneficial so that we know how to respond mindfully when we find ourselves in the heat of an emotional turmoil (Hanh, 2012). For instance, during those times when I feel that I am running on a short emotional fuse and am really having difficulty handling strong emotions, coping strategies have become a game changer for me. In other words, once I began incorporating strategies specifically developed to enhance my coping skills, it helped me manage my heightened emotions more effectively which in turn has led to  my feeling more joyful and balanced in my life with fulfilling relationships.

On Wednesday we will take a closer peek at how we can develop and implement our own coping techniques. Until then, stay organized!

********
It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity. – Albert Einstein
********

References:

Berry, M. A. (2013). Ethics in the Real World. USA: Kindle Direct Publishing.

Hanh, T. N. (2012). Work: How to find joy and meaning in each hour of the day. Berkeley, CA: Parallax Press.

Techniques for Practicing Mindful Awareness

Published July 25, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair
5.23
Many people are under the impression that they don’t have time to practice mindfulness. They feel their day is already so full that they are too busy to fit anything else in. In short, most people think mindfulness is something that is only practiced when they can make time, like they do when they plan a vacation or an outing to enjoy nature. Mindfulness, however, according to Plum Village Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh (2012), can be practiced anywhere at any time–at home, at the office, or even during a hectic and busy work day (Hanh, 2012). In other words, we don’t need to set time aside in order to practice mindful awareness; it only takes a few breaths to generate the energy of mindfulness that will bring us back to the present moment.
 original
When we are centered in the present and let go of thoughts about the past or the future, Hanh refers to this strategy as stopping. The stopping tactic is the strategy that works to bring us back to the present moment, where we can focus energy on our surroundings. The thought behind this tactic is that when we learn to stop everything we are doing, it can help us clear our minds so we can begin to see things more clearly from a new perspective. When we see with clarity, we are in a better position to understand the predicament or situation at hand. This is one way we can cultivate an ethical environment of understanding, compassion, peace, and happiness. In other words, in order to be fully present at our place of work with our colleagues, or personal life with our friends and family, we need to learn the art of stopping. Until we can stop and notice what is happening in the present moment, especially when we are experiencing heightened emotions, it will be difficult to generate joy, awareness, or compassion.
stock-footage-young-businessman-with-suitcase-walking-the-stairs-down

In his book, Work: How to Find Joy and Meaning in Each Hour of the Day, Hanh (2013) reveals how one successful business man has incorporated the practice of mindful awareness into his schedule. The busy executive does this by paying close attention to walking with awareness between business appointments. In other words, he practices mindful walking, placing awareness on his in-and-out breaths as he walks between office buildings at his place of employment. The business exec reports that people who pass him by smile at him because he seems so calm amidst the hustle and bustle of the crowds rushing by. Furthermore, the business man asserts that his meetings, even with difficult people, have become a lot easier and more pleasant since he started this practice. In a fast-paced world where chaos reigns, the evidence supports that implementing mindful practices like this, can help make the journey on this roller coaster of life more manageable.

Well, that wraps things up for this week. Wishing everyone a great weekend and have fun implementing your own methods of practicing mindful awareness.

References:

Hanh, T. N. (2012). Work: How to find joy and meaning in each hour of the day. Berkeley, CA: Parallax Press.

********
“Yelling at living things does tend to kill the spirit in them. Sticks and stones may break our bones, but words will break our hearts…”  – Robert Fulghum
********

Ethical Training and Preparation

Published June 18, 2014 by Mayrbear's Lair

Wharton-Folly-Finish1-652x4801

Advances in technology and innovative methods of operation continue to shape today’s business world. Because of this the concept, the academic and business community are rethinking their tactics and adapting a mindset that includes strategies for lifelong learning. In other words, many leading executives suggest that to achieve the best outcomes in a career today, higher levels of education, like formal academic training including bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as the participation in managerial training programs, are a significant part of that equation. In addition, Baack (2012) postulates that personal efforts to improve skills through channels like conferences, seminars, research, mentorships with experts, as well as a closer study of professional literature, are also quite common practices in today’s business arena. These are some of the strategies top performers in management utilize for the preparation and training of staff members to help them build and support a solid ethical foundation.

power-struggle

In his book Life Was Never Meant To Be A Struggle, Stuart Wilde (1987) revealed that when you accept full responsibility for your life you can also accept the concept that you are playing an active role in helping to shape your destiny (Wilde, 1987). Leaders who embrace this concept and want to establish and maintain a certain code of ethics in their organization, know that by working in partnership with staff members as a strategy, they can not only plan and shape their outcomes, they can also improve motivational and ethical behavior in the work place. My research work, some of which is compiled in my eBook, Ethics In The Real World (2013) revealed different strategies and examples of how executives achieve successful organizational outcomes in the workplace from the development of systems and programs that help provide higher levels of education for staff members. This is an important component for leaders looking to establish and build a solid ethical foundation (Berry, 2013).

CorpTraining

In conclusion, strategists can achieve higher results by enlisting the aid of management training programs. These programs are established to train staff members by providing them with higher levels of education in leadership skills and critical thinking. In fact, many who attend the more prestigious programs, like that of Rapport Leadership International, as I have, testify they are forever changed and return from these events equipped with a fresh perspective. In fact, many are so charged, they return eager to implement new goals with a driven enthusiasm in an effort to employ their newly enhanced skills. In short, top leaders concur that training programs are proven methods that help them establish and build a more solid foundation that encourages a more rewarding and ethical culture at their place of employment.

On Friday, we will look into what it takes to find the right fit with another person, organization, or group. Until then … keep working on your organizational skills.

********

Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others hire public relations officers. – Daniel J. Boorstin

********

References:

Baack, D. (2012). Organizational Behavior. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

Berry, M. A. (2013). Ethics in the Real World. USA: Kindle Direct Publishing.

Wilde, S. (1987). Life was never meant to be a struggle. Carlsbad, CA, USA: Hay House, Inc.

Ethics and Federal Compliance Laws

Published July 24, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

Aristotle

To comprehend the topic of business ethics, it is important to identify the voluntary and legally required aspects of institutional practices and the behavior that supports it. Aristotle (384– 322 BC) believed that a person’s good or bad character was developed by habituation. In other words a person’s goodness or wickedness is developed as the result of repeatedly engaging in acts that have a common quality. These repetitious acts rely on an individual’s natural aptitudes and tendencies to gravitate towards righteous or immoral behavior (Aristotle, 2012).  In other words, the formation of a person’s character emerges by actions that are committed repeatedly in a certain manner and as a result of being guided or receiving direction externally to support these patterns. Once the behavior is understood by the individual, they can then choose to engage their free will. The continuation then, of the behavior, becomes a habit which over time translates into second nature. This demonstrates how a leader’s conduct and business practices cultivate a climate that is adopted by subordinates. During the Enron scandal for example, investigators discovered that Enron’s leaders developed a culture of deceit that was supported by their top executives, board members, and corporate attorneys, to gain the competitive edge and ensure capital gains.

 Antiques-Question-Federal-Oversight

The Enron collapse revealed deep failings that existed in the American accounting system and in the operation of corporate boards. Enron and other widespread corporate accounting scandals resulted in Congress establishing the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX). It was designed to create a federal oversight system to monitor corporate accounting practices by making financial fraud reporting a criminal offense. Boatright (2009) reported that the SOX Act also increased the penalties for executives that engage in criminal activity. In addition, SOX addressed a wide range of provisions to require corporate transparency in three major areas: financial reporting, corporate boardrooms, and criminal law (Boatright, 2009). Poor business decisions alone however, did not result in Enron’s downfall. What was cleverly disguised from stakeholders was insider plundering. Because of this, Congress feels that Federal oversight is needed. Investors rely heavily on financial reports and in turn these reports can become the vehicles that lead to fraud. For example, by presenting a false image, executives can cover poor performance outcomes to maintain their lavish lifestyles. SOX changed the way corporations address problems with accounting and auditing. It requires that every publicly traded organization establish an independent auditing committee that is solely responsible for detecting fraud. It also supports internal whistle blowing by mandating all companies incorporate policies to support employees reporting acts of fraud without fear of retaliation.

 images (5)

CEOs careers are now on the line. They are required to sign off on company financial forms to ensure their processors have complied with all mandates. Many corporate chiefs complain about the amount of time and money that is invested to comply with SOX regulations, but most agree that it is worth the trouble to reassure investors. Ferrell et al. (2012) posit that in addition, the law requires corporations to design a code of conduct that includes transparency and accountability in financial reporting to stakeholders (Ferrell, Fraedrich, & Ferrell, 2013). Experts expect further misconduct to occur despite the regulatory laws because global competitors are not required to comply with these regulations. This means that more scrutiny is called for because the more integrated world markets become, the more difficult it is to compete on a global level when the playing field is uneven. In the meantime, only time will reveal the long term results.

References:

Aristotle. (2012). Ethics. Seattle, WA: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.

Boatright, J. (2009). Ethics and the Conduct of Business (Sixth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Ferrell, Fraedrich, & Ferrell. (2013). Business ethics and social responsibility (9th ed.). Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.