Human resource management

All posts tagged Human resource management

The Tough Screener

Published May 29, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

employee-screening-and-selection-68

Employers are struggling with employee recruiting challenges from an inherent inability to attract qualified candidates, in spite the high unemployment conditions. Arthur (2012) suggests that employers develop a three way recruiting strategy. This includes: (a) providing clarity and details about the organization like a mission statement and what each department contributes to long and short term goals; (b) target their recruiting strategies to motivate, attract, and retain high level performers; and (c) offer clarity to the applicants with respect to job description, expectations, opportunities for growth and advancement, as well as compensation plans, and benefit packages (Arthur, 2012). Employers who make these components clear and concise as part of the application process, put applicants in a better position to identify whether there is the possibility of an organizational fit.

Criminal-Background-Check

Although an employer is well within their rights to do as much homework as they can on a potential job candidate, they will ultimately run into issues if they do not remain within the legal framework and parameters of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), American Disabilities Act (ADA), and the Privacy Act of 1974. For example, conducting background checks requires a release that is fully executed by the applicant and gives authorization for a potential employer to conduct one (Dessler, 2011). Without this agreement, employers are setting themselves up for time consuming litigation by gathering information illegally or in a stealth manner without consent. In addition, although studies support the validity of honesty testing, most tests cannot accurately reveal the true nature of an individual. The test taker for example, may be focused on impressing their prospective employer. In fact, they may actually respond to a question the way they believe will render the highest score, rather than retort sincerely.

d6b96e513dcbd2ea7532d6840858e2c3-617x411

Instead, employers are encouraged to verbally ask honesty related questions like, “Have you ever covered up a lie for a colleague?”  In this way, the interviewer can detect clues in the applicant’s body language and the manner in which the individual responds to distinguish whether they feel the answer is satisfactory. A well skilled leader who participates in active listening can pick up nonverbal cues and discern whether the individual is sincere and confident in their response. Furthermore, some states like Rhode Island have very strict guidelines when it comes to implementing honesty tests in the application process. With strategic planning, leaders and Human Resource managers who are well versed in EEOC, ADA and the 1974 Privacy Act, can gather a wide range of candidate information legally, without violating any laws.

********

References:

Arthur, D. (2012). Recruiting, interviewing, selecting & orienting new employees. New York, NY: AMACOM.

Dessler, G. (2011). A framework for human resource management (Sixth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Human Resource Challenges

Published May 24, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

hr_chalanges

Some suggest that human issues are at the core of every business. Leaders who face these challenges look for opportunities to find solutions. Numerous executives are unaware that seeking methods to strategically plan, design, and measure work place performances may present possible solutions. Since many departments consist of teams with a well-developed vision of their strategic goals, leaders look to senior line managers to help solve growing problems like finding top quality personnel and utilizing technology effectively to serve their needs. These types of challenges arise because executives are unclear the role a human resource unit plays in an organization’s success. In fact, a growing number of researchers state that many corporate bosses find it difficult to identify Human Resource (HR) functions. Leaders want to support their significant assets – the people they hire and the technology they invest in – but are unable to comprehend how HR managers can help serve to achieve their vision. Ulrich and Huselid (2001) postulate that some of these problems emerge due to the inherent difficulty managers utilize to measure personnel performance records without an HR unit’s influence (Ulrich & Huselid, 2001). This research examines two of the biggest challenges facing HR departments today: personnel and technology and why leaders encounter these challenges without the guidance or collaboration of an efficient HR unit that serves to manage these important issues.

images

HR’s Influence on Personnel

In order to analyze the problems leaders face with respect to human resource units, we must first examine the influence an HR division has in a business arena. HR units are established to systematically supply and monitor intelligence on a regular basis to produce effective strategic systems. These strategies contribute to an organization’s culture and performance by managing personnel conflicts and challenges. For example, an HR management team typically provides the following organizational functions with respect to personnel: (a) training, (b) development, (c) efficiency, (d) flexibility, (e) compensation, (f) employee turnover, (g) the cost per hire, (h) job satisfaction, and (i) performance evaluation (Stavrou-Costea, 2005). In addition, HR managers assign effective strategies that assist with achieving goals. They are focused on developing a committed capable workforce that supports the cultivation of personnel productivity. They also incorporate training systems that are engaging, produce efficient knowledge in their employees, establish activities and methods to motivate commitment, and inspire higher performance levels in staff members to outperform the competition (Ulrich & Huselid, 2001).

In today’s organizational climate, leaders are experiencing extensive challenges in locating and hiring quality skilled workers who are dedicated and focused.  This occurs because organizations are finding it difficult to retain skilled employees.  In response, they are beginning to develop more effective training and development programs. Large corporations, for example, are competing for executives at smaller organizations. It is the HR department’s duty to ascertain, assimilate, develop, compensate, and retain valuable personnel. Organizations that are committed to excellence, for instance, understand the importance of cultivating skilled employees.  As a result, they invest in HR management systems and design programs that educate and motivate workers (Seyed-Mahmoud, 1999).

ithr

HR’s Influence on Technology

Technology is also a significant component in many areas of operational decision making. The use of innovative and upgraded technological systems has become standard practice throughout organizational management. A colossal obstacle that leaders face is the utilization of technology to improve performance and productivity (Seyed-Mahmoud, 1999). Some leaders, for instance, invest in technology as part of a new trend to keep up with the competition and therefore do not utilize the systems to full capacity. Effective leaders on the other hand, distribute communication devices to personnel like smartphones and tablets for the capabilities and features these electronic devices provide as self-sufficient smartware. These innovative devices offer features similar to those of portable computers at a fraction of the cost. The distribution of advance technology like this to personnel allows staff members the ability to access files, share information, and communicate instantly with colleagues and clients from remote locations. In short, productivity, efficiency, and long- and short-term goals are taken into consideration when making the most practical technological decisions.

In addition, HR managers are incorporating technology as management resources. For example, technology tools like (a) automated manufacturing processes, (b) personnel software packages, intellectual property rights (c) communication, (d) collaboration, and (e) internet and intranet systems can help HR management teams to measure strengths and weaknesses in performance and progress outcomes (Seyed-Mahmoud, 1999). HR managers in this case, work in collaboration with organizational leaders and personnel to make the best decisions on the most effective use of technology available to help run an organization more efficiently.

For instance, in today’s workplace, most offices consist of telephones, computers, IT networks, scanners, fax machines, and copiers.  With advances in communication technology, many of these devices can be linked over telephone lines and wireless modems to make up a more sophisticated telecommunication system capable of real-time interaction from remote locations. An employee in the field can now capture an image or video clip through their smartphone, upload it via a wireless connection, add an attachment to include any other pertinent information or documentation, and submit the transmission instantly, with the ability to reach others on a global level. These kinds of unprecedented advances open the door for productivity and invite opportunities that present challenges for those who are not able to acquire or retain the knowledge to implement these advances in a constructive manner.

HRM3

Conclusion

Our research shows that although some leaders may find it difficult to identify HR functions and systems, those that do not comprehend an HR unit’s influence and are unsure of their role in a company’s success will not last very long in today’s global marketplace. Without a Human Resource Department to tackle personnel and technology issues effectively, a company will face challenges which include recruiting and retaining top talent and communicating the organization’s vision. In conclusion, the key components to an effective human resource team consist of finding solutions that address their biggest challenges with respect to personnel and technology. An effective HR management team works in collaboration with leaders to gather intelligence, design activities, and incorporate effective programs that support the organization’s personnel and utilizes technology efficiently. In this context, the HR unit is established to support the company’s ability to remain flexible and manage systems efficiently.  An effective HR management team works in collaboration with the organization to achieve long term economic success.

********

References

Aghazadeh, S.-M. (1999). Human resource management: Issues and challenges in the new millennium. Management Research News. Patrington, England, UK: Emerald Group Publishing, Ltd. Retrieved May 9, 2013, from Proquest: http://search.proquest.com/docview/223548850?accountid=32521

Stavrou-Costea, E. (2005). The challenges of human resouce management towards organizational effectiveness: A comparative study in Southern EU. Journal of European Industrial Training. Bradford, England, UK: Emerald Groupd Publishing, Ltd. Retrieved May 9, 2013, from http://search.proquest.com/docview/215386876?accountid=32521

Ulrich, D., & Huselid, M. (2001). The HR scorecard: Linking people, strategy and performance. Boston, MA, USA: Harvard Business Review Press.

HR Units To The Rescue

Published May 20, 2013 by Mayrbear's Lair

HR-logo

In today’s business climate, leaders are having to address high employee turnover and the reasons behind the high volume of employee resignation in new hires.  Clues they receive from the remaining employees help give insight.  When an employer receives information that other employees are too busy and engaged in their own job responsibilities to help new hires, managers must find other more effective means to train new recruits. For example, at one banking firm, all branch supervisors hire their own employees, without communicating to the home office or other branches. In addition, employees were trained on equipment but only retained fragmented operational knowledge without understanding how it functioned or even the names of the machines they were working on.  All of these are clear symptoms of an organization in desperate need of services that Human Resource (HR) Management offers. HR management teams play a critical role to help organizations achieve their strategic goals.

human-resources-600x400

One possible solution the banking firm may apply to help manage their employee problem is to set up an HR unit at their main corporate office. This could prove to be an effective strategy to alleviate their high employee turnover problem. An HR unit can help a company achieve higher levels of success by providing the recruitment, training and development each staff member requires to perform their job more efficiently, with confidence, and punctuality. If employees were satisfied and confident in their positions, and can form a cohesive relationship with their associates and supervisors, they would not be inclined to resign so quickly. An effective HR management team can develop more efficient training programs and implement strategies that can help produce employees with higher skill levels, competencies, and behavior. These are some of the essential components that can help an organization achieve their desired outcomes. An HR management unit in the banking firm’s situation can help produce high performance work systems that will reduce employee turnover. The establishment of effective training programs can provide personnel the confidence to perform their responsibilities at higher levels. In addition, an HR unit can help create a more pleasant and safer environment that would prevent an employee’s loss of time (Dessler, 2011).

chart-human-resources

An HR unit in this situation functions to supply intelligence that will help develop effective and strategic plans to achieve the bank’s goals. For example, they could create incentive plans to motivate employees as well as help identify personnel strengths and weaknesses. In addition, they also serve to tackle other problems like: (a) attracting and retaining key employees, (b) training and developing the capabilities of employees for future needs, (c) dealing with expanded organizational use of HR technology to help employees comprehend procedure and functioning purposes for the machines and systems they operate, and (d) comply with revisions in changing labor laws that may affect issues for high employee turnover like discrimination, conduct errors, unions and other issues. All of these serve to keep employees satisfied and committed to an organization’s goals. HR strategies also serve to contribute to an organization’s culture and performance in the way conflicting issues are managed (Jackson & Mathis, 2011). In the bank’s situation, the HR team would train new hires so other workers can focus on their own responsibilities. In addition, an HR Unit set up at the main office, will establish precedent in training procedures that can work effectively for all bank branches. This way the HR managers would serve as staff managers to assist and advise the line managers (or supervisors) in areas like recruitment, hiring, and compensation packages. These are some of the strategies that an effective HR management unit designs and implements  to share the important responsibilities with employers so that they can run the company more efficiently.

********

References:

Dessler, G. (2011). A framework for human resource management (Sixth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Jackson, J., & Mathis, R. (2011). Human Resource Management (13th ed.). Mason, OH, USA: South-Western Cengage Learning.