Media Magic Publishing

All posts tagged Media Magic Publishing

Vacation Break

Published July 29, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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“To understand everything is to forgive everything” – Buddha

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For more information on Media Magic, our digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing

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Mayr’s Author Page.

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Summer Vacation

Published June 19, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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“Don’t be the firecracker that can injure others. Be mindful when your emotions ignite.” – M.A. Berry

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For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s author page

Summer Vacation

Published June 17, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

Child drawing a smiling sun on a sandy beach, with beach towel, starfish and flip flops (studio shot - warm color and directional light are intentional).

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“Sticks and stones may break our bones, but words will break our hearts” – Robert Fulghum

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For more information on Media Magic, our digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing

or amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page.

Summer Vacation

Published June 15, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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“Great moments are born great opportunity.” – Nicola Tesla

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Great deals for Dad this Fathers Day

For more information on Media Magic, our digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing

or amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page.

Summer Break

Published June 12, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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“If you can change your mind, you can change your life.” – William James

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For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s author page

 

Summer Vacation

Published June 10, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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“The best way to gain self-confidence is to do what you are afraid to do.” – Unknown

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Great deals for Dad this Fathers Day

For more information on Media Magic, our digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing

or amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page.

SUMMER BREAK

Published June 8, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

The word Summer written on a sandy beach, with scuba mask, beach towel, starfish and flip flops (studio shot - warm color and directional light are intentional).

The friendly folks at Media Magic are currently on vacation and will return soon! In the meantime, have a great summer everyone and keep working on your organizational skills!!

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“Success is falling nine times and getting up ten.” – Jon Bon Jovi

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For more information on Media Magic, our digital publications, or to purchase any of our accelerated learning Business Life titles, please visit our website at:

Media Magic Publishing

or amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page.

Spring Break: A Time for Renewal

Published March 23, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

2-Monday Spring Break

 Success Is Wholeness

While the magical folk at Media Magic are off for spring break we decided to post inspirational images this week and share some thoughts and insights to ponder.

In the online 21-Day Meditation Program, Manifesting True Success, Best Selling author and medical physician, Deepak Chopra (2015), suggests that our body, mind, and emotions are key allies in manifesting successful outcomes. He further suggests we consider enlisting our most vital and frequently overlooked ally in achieving success – our Being; the Being which is the silent, unshakable foundation of our life. It gives purpose, strength, balance, and direction to our life, just by virtue of its existence. This is different, he postulates, from the other allies which actively send signals back to us to condition and regulate life. This Being is self-regulating, self-sustaining, and self-aware. When we are connected to our Being, we feel secure, confident, loving, open, and awake (Chopra, 2015).

That’s it for today’s food for thought. Until next time … keep being organized!

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“You are loved for being who you are, just for existing.” – Ram Dass

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For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life audio book titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

References:

Chopra, D. (2015, March 22). Success is wholeness. Retrieved March 22, 2015, from Manifesting True Success: https://chopracentermeditation.com/experience#_=_

Norms, Artifacts, and Assumptions

Published January 30, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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In his book, Organizational Behavior, Baack (2012) discloses that artifacts are the overtly stated values and norms that identify individuals and organizations (Baack, 2012). Individual artifacts include the car a person drives, the clothing and jewelry they wear, piercings and other forms of items of value. These artifacts transmit nonverbal messages or kinesic cues that are communicated in a nonlinguistic way. An organization’s culture on the other hand, is determined by the observable artifacts. They represent the physical signs of an organization’s dominant culture, like the golden arches of McDonalds.

The most significant observable artifact at Capitol-EMI Industries, my former place of employment is the historic Capital Records Tower building in Hollywood. Like McDonald’s golden arches, the Capitol Records Tower is instantly recognized by the unique design which represents a stack of record discs. As a newly hired employee, I was fascinated with the design of a round building. It’s one thing to marvel at it from the outside, but another experience entirely from within the tower walls. The offices I worked at were located on the twelfth floor, so the views from that height were magnificent. When the Paramount Studios lot caught fire from the set of one of the Star Trek movies, we were able to view it from the office bay windows.  It wasn’t until I was promoted and transferred to the EMI offices down the road that I really began to appreciate the operations at the tower. Although I was content to find employment in a smaller one story building, with a second story loft where our executive offices were located, I look back now at that tower building with fond memories.

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The Capitol Records culture was transmitted in a variety of ways through the espoused values which include emphasis on sustainability and a commitment to high quality entertainment. The combination of observable artifacts which includes the company brand and logo, the tower building, and the catalog of famous artists, along with the espoused and enacted values, helped create role clarity for the employees. For example, the lobby of the building displayed many gold records from artists including: The Andrew Sisters, Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Nat King Cole, Neil Diamond, Bob Seger, and Tina Turner. The personnel who worked at the tower encountered these observable artifacts every day which gave staff members a sense of pride. Many of us grew up listening to these artists and were proud to be a part of such a prestigious family.

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Schein (2010) contends the connection between leadership and culture is clear in organizational cultures and micro-cultures. Managers influence the behavior of the subordinates. Those who are resistant to change do not last very long. (Schein, 2010). For example, when I was initially hired, I had just relocated from Arizona where I grew up. I had not resided in California long enough to adapt and blend in with the Southern California culture which was entirely different from that of a desert state like Arizona. My sense of style reflected that of a conservative small town. In fact, I recall one individual compare my fashion style to that of an airline flight attendant, which translated as professional, but not very hip.

The dress code varied from floor to floor and department to department. For example, the executive offices where the CEO and high ranking officers worked (all male) and each dressed in suit and tie, while their administrative staff were dressed in professional accouterments that reflected their executive office. The floor where the A&R (Artist and Repertoire) and R&B (Rhythm and Blues) departments were located (where our Business Affairs division was also situated) the executives attire resembled that of the artists they represented. For instance, the executives who signed the rock bands dressed like the rock stars; the executives who signed the rap artists looked like rappers. I was employed with the attorneys who negotiated the artist contracts and eventually adapted a style that blended with the norm of the support staff on that floor, which consisted of a combination of those from the A&R department with that of a professional business look that would reflect positively on the attorneys we worked with.

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The espoused values and assumptions both helped and hindered moving the company into a learning organization. Executive leaders learned to work together cohesively and in tandem to achieve company goals, but at times engaged in conflicts from policies and actions that were not always supportive. For example, when an artist’s profits and popularity soared after their initial debut album, the artist’s manager and attorney immediately looked to renegotiate their contracts. The department head of A&R could decide to either support the position of the manager and artist, refuse their requests, or face other executive branches that are in alignment with the artist’s position. It is here the negotiation process begins pitting company leader against company leader as the artist’s camp engageds into debates with the policy holders. Each incident becomes a learning experience as every situation is unique and no two artists are the same.

The department where I worked got involved when contractual inquiries or disputes arose. We provided information that either armed the A&R executive or deflected the A&R department from operating outside the parameters of the contractual commitments. As a rule however, the members of the Capitol Records family enjoyed a positive culture of stability. The recognizable observable artifacts, perceptions of espoused values and functioning, were developed to support company values that helped generate a greater sense of clarity for the personnel.

That’s it for this week! Until next we meet again … Keep organizing those systems!

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A woman with organizing skills can run a construction company without ever picking up a hammer and nail. – Warren Farrell

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For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

 

References:

Baack, D. (2012). Organizational behavior. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

Schein, E. (2010). Organizational culture and leadership. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

 

Organizational Scholarship

Published January 28, 2015 by Mayrbear's Lair

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There is a growing interest in the learning systems in organizational contexts fueled by a belief that innovation and education are essential for the survival of a firm. Harvard Business Professor David Garvin (2000) explains that there simply is no one way of learning successfully. Although people in leadership positions command an arsenal of skills, each method of learning remains consistent, in that it requires the acquisition, interpretation, and application of new data (Garvin, 2000). A top manager of a major clothing store, for instance, that is asked to help design a program to increase the level of organizational learning, may decide to conduct an analysis as their first strategy, to ascertain the current organizational behavior, then develop a way to retrieve unfiltered information from participating staff members. This would ensure that the data gathered consists of accurate intelligence and up-to-date information. The information collection process could center on identifying and comprehending behavior that is influenced by: (a) the technologies available, (b) the barriers and regulations that are implemented, and (c) the social demographics. This method could serve to acknowledge weaknesses and strengths that could assist in the design of an effective program to increase the level in organizational learning.

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Another strategy may include the formation of systems that incorporate employee self-analysis and assessment to encourage a learning culture; one that embraces openness from direct observation, feedback, and evaluation as part of the process. Argyris (1992) states organizational learning is a proficiency that all organizations should cultivate. The better they are at learning the more likely they can identify and correct errors as well as recognize when they are unable to detect and correct their own miscalculations. He further contends that organizational defenses are one of the most significant barriers to learning. These defenses include policies, practices, or actions that prevent participants (at any level) from experiencing growth. In this context, organizational defenses are anti-learning and overprotective. For this reason, the data collection process must be constructed to identify existing barriers and defenses that can obstruct the learning process. This can help identify policies and actions that prevent growth (Argyris, 1992).

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Questionnaires are the most popular method used to gather information, because they obtain subjective data about the participants that can be analyzed with measurable documented results. In order to develop an effective information gathering plan, however, data may also be collected by survey, interviews or in focus group situations. The data collection plan might: (a) focus on specific topics, (b) contain appropriate tested questions, (c) include participation from the stakeholders, and (d) address any anonymity issues. In addition, the observation design process must also include the ease of analysis, tabulation and summation. Once the unfiltered data is collected, it can be examined and disseminated to identify problems and trouble spots that distinguish which systems are successful and which models are not as effective (Phillips & Stawarski, 2008).  Also, as a means to connect emotionally and engage staff enthusiasm and support, a briefing for the participants on the significance of the program may be helpful in articulating that the process is part of a special campaign with end goals that will reflect positive results. Finally, another step may be to endorse the use of incentives and include additional tools like an introduction video or other form of electronic communication from the highest executive office to personalize the plan and help manage any employee fears. In conclusion, the combination of these strategies may help provide the detailed intelligence required in the development and design of a more effective learning organization.

That’s it for this post! Until next time … keep organizing your systems!

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Successful organizing is based on the recognition that people get organized because they, too, have a vision. – Paul Wellstone

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For more information on Media Magic’s digital publications, or to purchase any of our Business Life titles, please visit amazon.com’s new feature called “Author Central” to view:

Mayr’s Author Page

 

References:

Argyris, C. (1992). on organizational learning (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, Inc.

Garvin, D. (2000). Learning in action: A guide to putting the learning organization to work. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Phillips, P. P., & Stawarski, C. A. (2008). Data collection: Planning for and Collecting all types of data. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.